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5 Traits Creative People Have That Most People Will Never Understand

28 February 2015

From Elite Daily:

Creative people are troublemakers. They’re druggies. They’re slightly bonkers. And they usually dress funny… or so many of us would like to think.

Creative people are, by definition, different. Of course, everyone in the world is a little different from the next person, even though most of us are trying our best to blend in.

For creative individuals, “blending in” sounds like the exact opposite of being creative. Most creative individuals aren’t crazy; they’re simply misunderstood.

. . . .

At the same time, creative people are willing to share what they see and how they interpret it with the rest of the world. To them, the world has more meaning, more intricacies, more complexity and more possibility than it does for the average person.

Creative people believe in the possibility of the impossible because they understand you never really know anything for sure.

. . . .

Creative types don’t dislike all people; they just usually spend more time on their own because it allows them to focus on thinking and imagining — even drawing, planning and creating.

Creative individuals have to act on their creativity. Otherwise, they’re left with an itch they can’t scratch. While they do enjoy the company of their friends, they’re also very passionate about their ideas and creations — sometimes to the point of obsession.

Link to the rest at Elite Daily and thanks to James for the tip.

Creativity

20 Comments to “5 Traits Creative People Have That Most People Will Never Understand”

  1. Huh.
    I think we need an article titled “5 Traits Mature Creative Adults Have that Twenty-Something Special Snowflakes Will Never Understand (Until They Grow Up)”.

    • (if they ever grow up — some of us never do … ;-))

      .

      The older I grow, the less important the comma becomes. Let the reader catch his own breath. — Elizabeth Clarkson Zwart

      The older I grow, the more I distrust the familiar doctrine that age brings wisdom. — H.L. Mencken

  2. Eh.

    This is a very limited view of what creativity and creative people are like. Perhaps the author of the piece fits this description. I find myself in sympathy with Teri upthread and the “Twenty-Something Special Snowflake” remark.

    Creativity is not limited to the arts, and mathematicians and engineers and scientists are often very creative.

    • NO No no, engineers are not creative — engineers are LAZY! They get assigned silly tasks by their ‘bosses’ and try to come up with the easiest and quickest way to get said bosses to leave them to whatever they were playing with (unless of course they ‘really’ don’t like that boss, in which case they will come up with the most elaborate scheme they think they can get away with!)

      Sometimes, accidentally, they turn out not only a project — but a work of art … (no creativity involved, just laziness! 😉 )

      .

      Nature makes boys and girls lovely to look upon so they can be tolerated until they acquire some sense. — William Phelps

      • @ Alan

        “NO No no, engineers are not creative — engineers are LAZY! They get assigned silly tasks by their ‘bosses’ and try to come up with the easiest and quickest way to get said bosses to leave them to whatever they were playing with (unless of course they ‘really’ don’t like that boss, in which case they will come up with the most elaborate scheme they think they can get away with!)”

        LOL. The basic premise oF Dilbert v. the Pointy-Haired Boss and the CEO, whose head resembles a, uhm, …

        And Wally’s got it down totally! 🙂

        • Never, ever underestimate the awesome destructive power of a drunk, belligerent, brute-force-loving, pissed-off engineer…

      • In defense of the creativity of engineers:

        Necessity may be the mother of invention, but Laziness is the father!

    • The *author* fits the description, exactly.
      That’s what I find so tiresome in so many of these pieces that presume to define what creativity is, and who creative people are – the author describes themselves and their friends. They don’t look outside their own box, and they aren’t actually creative enough, or experienced enough, to see how creativity expresses beyond their own narrow experience of it.

      Also, there is a tendency to attribute some of their own personal limitations to their ‘creativity’, instead of to their own lack of discipline, responsibility or personal accountability.

      But the thing that irritates me the very, very, most is: when someone starts using the phrase ‘creative people’ they are making a judgement that some people are creative and some people are not.

      And that is just flat not true.

      Some people live in creative flow all the time, and some people are so shut down – normally a result of internalizing other people’s judgement – that they think they aren’t creative at all. But they have it in them.

      • Yes, I was going to say the same thing about the idea that there are creative people and not creative people. My husband thinks he’s not creative and it holds him back from trying certain things. He fixes computers and cars, and when he doesn’t have the exact part he needs and uses other things to make something work, that’s being creative! But he thinks that because he works with nuts and bolts and things that click together one intended way, that he can’t try something with less concrete rules, like graphic design. He’s intensely drawn by it and has a good eye for style, but won’t try it (or give it more of a chance) because he’s convinced he’s not creative. I think it’s more that there’s that learning curve to go through before he can make things as good as he pictures them in his head.

      • …they are making a judgement that some people are creative and some people are not.

        Good point. I tend to think that creativity goes with being human. We are all problem solvers to some extent. And solving puzzles (whether of living or of more constructed situations) is creativity in action.

      • Following your logic, we would be wrong not to ascribe the quality of tallness to dwarfs and midgets because they possess the attribute of height.

  3. Another of the short-sighted ‘my way is the only way’ posts.

    Either that, or I’m doomed.

  4. There’s a difference between being capable of creativity, and identifying as a creative person. The former usually make a living in jobs where they’re expected to conform in dress and behavior to an accepted standard. Those who identify as creatives, frequently dress and act to please themselves, or to purposely distinguish themselves from the day-job-havers. They choose self-expression over being “normal”. Which limits the jobs they can do. So money is the real difference in how people express themselves openly, IMO. People who want or need more, conform. People who need less, might choose not to.

  5. Around here we have lots of creative types, you just wouldn’t know it at first glance because they all dress and drink like fishermen.

  6. What is a creative person? How do we identify them? If we have a group of 100 , how do we determine who is creative, and who is not?

    What do we have to know before we can decide who is creative, and who is not?

  7. Creativity is the intersection of intelligence and psychoticism.

  8. Uh, unless coffee is a narcotic now and sandals with socks just made a comeback, I think I’m safe.

    I think sub-consciously I’m saving my drama-queen-snowflake-flapping moments up for a big one that will go nuclear when I’m 95. I haven’t decided if I’ll go out riding a warhead or not, but it will be explosive.

    Until then, I’ll try to give up my caffeine addiction. (Seriously, a druggie? I quit carbs, smoking, alcohol and porn!)

  9. My father, a science fiction writer, has published over 50 novels and some 200 short stories, he’s been nominated for at least 35 Hugos (5 of which he won), won a Nebula, has been paid to write screenplays, and has reinvented his career multiple times over the course of 50 years. I think he counts as a creative person.

    I’ve sold about 30 books and 70 short stories, have won awards in 2 genres, and have reinvented my writing career several times, too. I think I also count as a creative person.

    But I think anyone who meets us or knows us slightly in our daily lives thinks of us as ordinary middle-class Midwesterners with unadventurous dress-sense and pretty standard interests and pursuits–and me, in particular, as a conventional person with good manners.

    Since I was raised by a writer, I never had any illusions or concern about who “seems like” a creative person and who does not, or what the “characteristics of a creative person” are or are not. But I regularly see that these concerns and mythologies are still alive and well and widely dispersed…

    • Oh, OTOH, when I was recently staying with close friends, my 14 year old (honorary) nephew asked me if it was okay if he invited a friend over for the day. I said he should ask his parents, not me–and he said, no, they wouldn’t care either way, but he knows that I’m not comfortable with people around me. (wg) True enough.

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