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Taste-Test Your Books: The Secret Sauce to Boost Sales

16 September 2015

From Rob Eagar  at Digital Book World

The publishing business is one of the few industries with the audacity to create a lot of new products without testing them on consumers first. Imagine running a restaurant and never taste-testing new recipes before serving them to customers. Or imagine automobile companies trying to sell cars without test-driving the vehicle first. What if Hollywood never pre-screened their movies before opening night? You get my point. Failing to test new products on consumers before launching them is a risky business move.

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You don’t have to try to guess what readers will like. Instead, test books on them, and let them convey what works and what areas need improvement. Gathering this kind of specific information will help improve sales, as it’s easier to incite word of mouth when you use the consumers’ own language to communicate a book’s value.

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The digital age of reading now enables publishers to take advantage of the same approach better than ever. So taste-test your books on readers just like great chefs taste-test their new menus. Why leave money on the table? These days, you can have your cake and eat it, too.

Read the rest here.

From Guest Blogger Randall

Advertising-Promotion-Marketing, Big Publishing, Bookstores, Discovery, The Business of Writing

8 Comments to “Taste-Test Your Books: The Secret Sauce to Boost Sales”

  1. [slaps forehead] Why didn’t I think of this YEARS ago? All I have to do is write stuff that people want to read!

    Thanks, Digital Reader Guy!

  2. Then there are always the books that people don’t know they want to read yet. Harry Potter is a good example of that.

  3. Isn’t he essentially saying to use beta readers?

  4. Sorry, this doesn’t quite work as ‘you’ liked the taste of what you were offering to serve your readers — or I’m guessing this blogger never notices what they’re saying? 😉

  5. I wonder if he really thinks he’s invented the idea of beta readers. I suppose it’s possible, but it would mean that he’s been living in a very different world than mine!

  6. “Leaving money on the table”. If anyone had edited or “taste-tested” this article, at least two mentions of the money and table reference would have been cut. Annoying!

    Not that this is bad advice. It’s just old news.

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