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Why crowdfunding is vital to disabled creatives

30 September 2015

From author Lesley Smith via Kickstarter:

Tonight I want to talk to you about disability and what Kickstarter means for people like me.

This isn’t a sob story or emotional B.S., this is me trying to explain what a lifeline crowdfunding is to me personally.

I’m disabled, I make no bones about that. I’m legally blind, I have bipolar disorder (a boon and a bane but I wouldn’t change it), I was born so early and my brain so saturated by oxygen that I have white matter damage and my brain literally spent years rewiring itself, I have physical co-ordination issues and high functioning autism (which is genetic). I have PTSD (don’t ask). I have Generalised Anxiety Disorder. I’m introverted and my autism means I have a schedule which I hate breaking.

I’m also on enough medication to knock over a horse and my life is painfully constricted by timing and the side-effects of my medication which makes me incredibly tired and to sleep for twelve hours (if I can actually get to sleep). My life is about ensuring I take my meds at the right moment and get up early enough that I can miss the fog.

Oh and drink coffee.

I have a guide dog (and unofficial emotional support hound) named Uni who puts up with me. I use a white cane and wear dark glasses to avoid getting migraines (I’m very light sensitive). Despite that I go to Zumba twice a week, I’m active and I have quite the social life and circle of friends, many of whom are also on the spectrum of disability (and most have their own gorgeous canine companions).

. . . .

I was a journalist for a decade before my heath problems got worse. I used to work seventy hours a week, traveling all around the world. I used to be able to earn more than enough to be comfortable, to support myself and then my sight deteriorated to the point where I just couldn’t any more and my mental health took that moment to plummet.

. . . .

Disability means that I’m creative but it also means I’m on limited funds. I don’t quite live hand to mouth but it’s close. If I want something I have a choice of credit or saving for months.

It means fun projects, like publishing books, are completely out of the question. I cannot afford to get my books edited, to pay for covers and proofs, to turn a project from words on a page to a Real Book™. This is why I crowdfund.

The thing is anyone who thinks crowdfunding is easy, well they’ve never done it. Unless you’re doing a massive project with a billion follows you have to earn every pound. £4k might as well be £400,000 and books are, sadly, a niche product and it’s so much hard to fund, let along over-fund. You’re also a one-man band; I’m the PR girl, I do the finances, I liaise with the members of my indie toolbox to ensure the editing is done on time, that the covers are perfect. You get the idea.

. . . .

Normally, if I was neurotypical or not disabled, if I wanted to do something like publish a book, I’d work extra hours, I’d get a second job or start a freelance business. As a disabled author I simply don’t have that option; publishing one book would take me a year if I had to save for it myself and crowdfunding allows me to cut that time in thirds, perhaps even less.

. . . .

Disability restricts me, crowdfunding frees me.

Link to the rest at Kickstarter

Here’s a link to Lesley Smith’s books. If you like an author’s post, you can show your appreciation by checking out their books.

Self-Publishing, The Business of Writing

3 Comments to “Why crowdfunding is vital to disabled creatives”

  1. Crowdfunding can be vital to anyone without the means to finance their creative activity. The trick is convincing the crowd that your project is worthy of their money — much like any investor.

  2. I couldn’t get her kickstarter video to play for me. I wish her all the best and I hope she makes it. Some people are dealt a lot to deal with in life. She appears to not let it stop her from living life anyway. Again, I hope she makes it.

  3. As a disabled writer, I totally applaud Lesley and wish her all the best.

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