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98 Book Marketing Ideas That Can Help Authors Increase Sales

3 February 2016

From BookBub:

Whether you’re a self- or traditionally published author, there’s a wide array of marketing tactics you or your publisher can use to amplify a book’s exposure and reach more readers. To spark inspiration and get those creative juices flowing, we put together 98 book marketing ideas.

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Publishers, this is a great resource to share with your authors. If you’re collaborating with them on marketing efforts, this can help them brainstorm ways they can promote their own books alongside your promotional pushes.

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Link to the rest at BookBub

Advertising-Promotion-Marketing

27 Comments to “98 Book Marketing Ideas That Can Help Authors Increase Sales”

  1. Link different book formats together. In the case of an ebook with a related print product, make sure both of the editions use the same ISBN on retailer sites. This ensures that visitors to your product page can easily purchase the format they prefer.

    I don’t think the ISBN police, who’d like you to use up as many of those expensive numbers as possible, will agree with this. IIRC, they were arguing that each ebook format should have a distinct number.

    • Using the same ISBN for different formats would certainly cause problems with dealers, especially Amazon. They REALLY want…and need…to know whether the customer is ordering a print book or an ebook.

      • Agreed, terrible advice. Stores dealing with print books will rightfully be annoyed. For e-books, the format in itself is an ISBN; its not as if you can sell your Amazon mobi on BN’s epub store (or vice versa). I can’t see the point of wasting ISBNs on ebooks.

    • a 1000 times no! Different isbns are needed so we know for sure we are getting the audio book or the spanish translation paperback. Not just for the larger stores, websites for smaller retailers are sometimes so awful you cannot tell what you are buying unless you can match it to an isbn and even then you are praying that the store entered its info correctly.

  2. More like 5 useful ideas, 25 business basics, and 68 ways to waste authors’ time. I mean really. Sign up to get 3 emails a day from reporters, and then hurry up and respond so that maybe you get your name in an article somewhere? That’s not going to sell books. Whenever there’s an author posting an article on Huffington Post, just look at their book rank on Amazon.

    BookBub is usually informative, but this one really pooped the bed.

    • More like 5 useful ideas, 25 business basics, and 68 ways to waste authors’ time.

      That was my reaction also. I felt like I’d wasted my time reading the post. It was just a summary of the full grab bag of possibilities that indies explored 2 years ago.

    • Yeah, I signed up for the Help a Reporter Out twice and bailed after a month.

      It’s an insightful way to learn how the media sausage is ground. You have writers assigned a subject desperate for anyone to wear the “expert” badge to fulfill their story’s premise, even if it’s wrong or misleading.

      You also realize that a lot of guests coming out of shows based in New York have to live within a few hours of the city, because they’re certainly not going to fly you in from the midwest. So nearly every guest is going to bring the same attitudes to whatever story they’re promoting.

      Unless you’re planning on branding yourself on some high-profile subject, or going to do something that’ll cause People magazine to bang down your door, save yourself the trouble. Waste of time.

      • Idid it once for some outfit, named something or other that sent digests of about ten items a day. Prob was many of the ‘writers’ were coy about who their assignments were for, or whether they were onlyon spec, and couldnt say if they would indeed use your quotes IF you invested your precious time as true expert. Though I found it interesting for another reason that it was not meant for. That is one overview of articles to come in mags and etc that appear to be of interest to mostly pop culture.

        I’d be amazed if they were seeking an expert in frozen research cures in abraxis code.

      • Idid it once for some outfit, named something or other that sent digests of about ten items a day. Prob was many of the ‘writers’ were coy about who their assignments were for, or whether they were onlyon spec, and couldnt say if they would indeed use your quotes IF you invested your precious time as true expert. Though I found it interesting for another reason that it was not meant for. That is one overview of articles to come in mags and etc that appear to be of interest to mostly pop culture.

        I’d be amazed if they were seeking an expert in frozen research cures in abraxis code.

  3. Very basic.

  4. I’m afraid to even look, the page PG posted was scary enough. 113 pages for ’98 ideas’ smells strongly of click-bait to me …

    • If you follow the link to BB they are also listed out on the page. No need to click 113 times. Just scroll. Still maybe not a great use of time, but not as bad as clicking after each one.

      • Heh, from what you and others have posted, it sounds like I’m better off staying ignorant of their ‘great ideas’.

  5. One of the suggestions is to do interviews. I’m non-fiction so it probably fits my work more easily. Plus I feel comfortable doing them so that’s a nice bonus.

    I have 17 interviews scheduled in the first quarter of 2016 (so far). I’m working with a publicist who specializes in my genre.

    I’ve done two so far. The first interview added more than 100 people to my newsletter, 50 to my FB group set up especially for newbies to my work, and I saw a distinct uptick in book sales. Yesterday I talked with someone in Canada who bought 15 of my books after the interview!

    The second interview doesn’t seem to have made much of an impact although it did give some nice content to share with the new folks.

    Interviews are leading to more interviews a people say, “I heard you on _________, will you come on my show?”

    It’s the thing I’m trying for 2016.

    FACEBOOK TIP
    I’ve been wondering where I can share this and now seems like a good spot.

    Facebook changes the type of post they “reward.” Sometimes it’s videos, sometimes it’s text only, sometimes it’s something else.

    Right now, it’s ONE photo with ONE link.

    When I shared my FB event for an upcoming interview, it was shown to 8 people in 18 hours.

    This morning I shared the exact same link but added a photo rather than let FB auto add the event photo and it has been shown to 98 people in one hour.

    • I should clarify. These are radio interviews.

    • On the FB views….Veronica, I agree. I’ve noticed that FB likes a picture and a shortened link. I’ve seen significant rise in “views” (and “clicks” via my bitly stats) when I format my posts this way. Works great for sharing books on Amazon. Don’t allow the “link” to format the picture. I add text and a bitly link after adding my pic to the post.

      • The post I mentioned above with the photo is up to 262. The one that had an auto-filled photo?

        drum rolllllllll

        9

        Yes, the same content in the same four hours gets shown to 163 more people because I put a photo in the post rather than let FB automatically add the photo from the event page.

        This isn’t an isolated case either.

        For some time the magic formula was NO LINKS. Now it’s a photo and a link. Have to keep on eye on FB.

    • veronica that is I think good business to be on radio andstreaming radio
      shows

      Do you choose by their numbers of listeners, or just go with the flow?

      I’ve not seen a place that tells us all how facebook is currently conniving, er I mean having a set way that a fb page user can gain more readers without being so strangled as fb has done over and over. How would one know what/ where to find their most recent ‘formula’ in the future?

      Again, I like hearing that your radio is paying off for you. Keep going

      • Right now I’m letting the publicist pick the shows for the most part. She has a 30 year history in my genre and used to publish a paper magazine back in the day so she has tons of contacts. Some shows are “small” and some are “big” (I don’t know the numbers of listeners) but all have shown to convert listeners into buyers for her other clients.

        Facebook…. What I do is that I keep an eye on my views. If I see that they are lower than average, I try a different type of post. When one type “hits” I keep doing that until it doesn’t and then I experiment to find what they are rewarding.

        I did try to boost a couple of posts and didn’t get any sales. I would love to have a link to any solid advice about the strategy of boosting FB posts. Maybe someone has a good article or video. I was flying blind and it showed.

        Because I’m posting again, I will update the view count. The views are 375 and 10 now. Remember, the 10 post has 18 more hours on FB and is the same content on the same account except for the photo.

        However, 375 is lower than average by at least 50% so I will start experimenting with my posts tomorrow.

  6. Interviews take time and energy, and for people like me, consistently get things wrong.

    I won’t be doing any.

  7. PG, take the numbers off of the end of your SlideShare link.

  8. Could we please finally stop telling writers/publishers to use a review blurb in place of an excerpt or summary blurb? :/ Okay, I get it, there are people who like them and respond to them, so cool. But I give literally zero damns what some reviewer or big-name writer thinks of a book; I want a summary blurb and an excerpt, dammit, and I’m not the only one. You want to put a review blurb in there somewhere, fine, but not in place of the actual informative stuff. [sigh]

    Angie

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