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Startup of the week: Publishizer

19 February 2016

From The Bookseller:

The pitch

Publishizer matches authors with publishers during pre-orders campaigns. It’s like Kickstarter meets Tinder, for publishing.

Who’s behind it?

Guy Vincent, a charismatic Australian who now lives, naturally, in California’s Mountain View. In 2011 Vincent launched the digital division of South-East Asia’s largest book printing company, Tien Wah Press, in Singapore, but after noticing how many promising writers and artists struggled to fund their print runs he quit his job, moved to India, and teamed up with two German engineers to build a crowd-funding platform for books. A year into the startup, the team was accepted into the 500 Startups accelerator in Silicon Valley and pivoted their focus to matching authors with publishers.

What’s the gap in the market?

“Over 2 million book proposals are submitted to literary agents in the US every year – and 96% of those are rejected,” Vincent explains. “That’s almost 2 million people in the US alone who are seeking a publisher for their book, every year. We realised we could use our pre-orders metrics to match our authors with publishers based on their interests. So, rather than being painfully rejected dozens of times, we can flip that equation and bring our authors dozens of interested publishers.”

Link to the rest at The Bookseller and thanks to Karen for the tip.

Bookstores

21 Comments to “Startup of the week: Publishizer”

  1. So — they see themselves as another type of agent/middleman?

    Heh, yup, 15% agent cut …

  2. really???

    “rather than being painfully rejected dozens of times, we can flip that equation and bring our authors dozens of interested publishers.””

    Dozens you say?

    I can also for a fair amount of money buy dozens of whiskeys for a dollar a shot, but most all will be rotgut. It would be a heat wave in hell before I’d get ‘the Jack’ as one of the ‘dozens.’ Doesnt matter how neat a drinker I am [those here who are old school know that term] Im still going to be on rotgut row if I think I can swill ‘dozens’. There just arent dozens of power and quality.

    Just sayin’

    • @ USAF

      “rather than being painfully rejected dozens of times, we can flip that equation and bring our authors dozens of interested publishers.””

      And all of them ASI imprints?

      • @James F. Brown, ASI is a publisher? You and I and about bajillion others think they are plunderers.

        That would just be sad if they are planning on being a funnel to AS.

  3. How much you wanna bet tons of those “publishers” have the words “Author” and “Solutions” somewhere in their DNA?

  4. Huh? This is an (Author) Solution in search of a problem.

    “after noticing how many promising writers and artists struggled to fund their print runs”

    But this is 2016. Writers don’t need to fund their print runs anymore. They also don’t need publishers anymore. Both problems have already been solved by these guys:

    https://kdp.amazon.com/
    https://www.createspace.com/

  5. The core idea is sound, improve your chances of being picked up by a publisher by showing an existing audience.

    You can do the same by going indie. The readers get the book now, and you get paid now.

    With no trad pub or indie track record, how successful is a pre-order likely to be?

    I too suspect most of the publishers will be connected to Author Solutions. On the bright side, if you pre-sell the books you won’t be as deep in the hole after, but you’ll still be overpaying for services.

    The core idea is sound, but this middleman seems unneeded.

    • The core idea is to be a middleman… to help set you up with another middleman. This is sound?

      • The core idea that an proven audience makes you more desirable to a publisher, yes. The middleman, no. The only middlemen publishers deal with are agents. Agents don’t deal with any middlemen. I mean reputable publishers and agents.

        So, no, you absolutely, definitely do not need this service.

        If you do have an proven audience, it isn’t even a given that you need a publisher. At least not on the publisher’s terms.

  6. I submitted this after getting a solicitation letter from them today in my incarnation as a publisher. Which really makes me wonder what kind of massive scraping they’re doing, since my imprint is extremely obscure. What sort of list would “Perkunas Press” even show up on?

  7. Really poor choice of a name.

    Publishizer = Publischeisse. Scheisse, pronounced with a “z” sound (shizeh), which is German for s***.

  8. A new version of the manuscript pitch website, Writers Beware has covered this sort of thing so many times – this post might be helpful: http://accrispin.blogspot.com/2015/03/manuscript-pitch-websites-do-literary.html

  9. Should have gone with “Pub-inator”.

  10. “…a charismatic Australian who now lives, naturally, in California’s Mountain View.”

    Very loud warning bells always go off in my head whenever I read about a “charismatic” person who has a new product or service to sell.

  11. Isn’t this a rehash of manuscript submission services such as Autonomy?
    See http://accrispin.blogspot.co.nz/2010/08/bowker-manuscript-submissions.html

  12. They spammed me. And I found the email slightly dishonest in that it seemed to involve a prize of $2,500 but upon further inspection the prize seemed to be payable in services of theirs.

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