Home » Nook » Barnes & Noble to divest its Nook store of third-party Android apps

Barnes & Noble to divest its Nook store of third-party Android apps

3 March 2016

From Chris Meadows via TeleRead:

Barnes & Noble is emailing Nook owners explaining that, as of March 15, B&N will no longer offer third-party Android apps for sale via its app store. All previously-purchased apps will remain available for download, but no new ones will be sold. In-app purchases will no longer be supported, either.

. . . .

The rationale for the change is offered in full-on public-relations speak:

This change is being made to concentrate our focus and efforts on our core digital content business, which are Books and Newsstand, for our US customers.

We will continue offering to US customers our full service for NOOK Books, NOOK Magazines, and NOOK Newspapers on both NOOK devices and our standalone Reading Apps. We look forward to continuing to bring the best content discovery and reading experiences to our NOOK customers.

So, basically, the added effort and expense of listing third-party apps for sale was distracting Barnes & Noble from its core mission of providing digital content for Nook customers. That’s why B&N’s main competitor, Amazon, doesn’t do such a thing itself…oh, wait, it sort of does. And doesn’t allow Fire owners to add apps from Google Play.And continues to outcompete B&N, while it’s at it.

Link to the rest at TeleRead

Sounds like reducing losses in the Nook division to PG. Remaining Nookers are burning up the wires to LinkedIn and sending résumés out in herds.

Nook

12 Comments to “Barnes & Noble to divest its Nook store of third-party Android apps”

  1. I Got an email that they’re shutting down Nook Video too.

    And another site posted that they sent out an email saying they’re shutting down the UK opertions too.

  2. Sounds like reducing losses in the Nook division to PG.

    — “The person who did that quit.”

  3. And doesn’t allow Fire owners to add apps from Google Play

    I think this is a small part of the reason the Fire Phone (or whatever it was called) tanked as badly as it did. Granted, it was probably sixth or seventh on the list, but it was an issue.

    • To be fair, Amazon doesn’t lock down the Fire tablets, so you can add Google Play apps by sideloading without much effort. I don’t know if the Fire phone was the same way.

    • Isn’t this a Google restriction? If I remember correctly, you’re not allowed to use their app store unless you ship a bunch of Google apps on your device.

      • Yes, and Google also used to be pickier about who got Google Play. Back then a lot of generic tablets did not have it.

        • This is because Android 1.* and 2.* were only meant for use on smartphones. Anything that wasn’t an actual phone, with a cellular transciever—be it a media player like an iPod Touch, or a full-sized tablet—didn’t qualify; Google didn’t want its official services running on a platform they didn’t support yet.

          The manufacturers could hack some version of Android onto such a gizmo, and many OEMs did, but they couldn’t put Google Play onto it. (Though in at least one case a cheap tablet maker did, without permission, by accident—it was a development build that accidentally went to production.)

          Android 3.0 was the first Android meant for tablets, and 4.0 was the first Android for tablets that was actually any good.

      • Yes, and Google also used to be pickier about who got Google Play. Back then a lot of generic tablets did not have it.

  4. Does this suggest the the Nook is soon to vanish…I wonder.

  5. Nothing like getting a little NOOKy, eh?

    Or not… 🙁

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.