Joe Konrath

Kindle Unlimited Thoughts

29 July 2015

From Joe Konrath:

Like everyone else in KDP Select, I’ve been paying attention to my Kindle Unlimited page reads.

When the new accounting began at the beginning of this month, I had 33,000 daily page reads. I had no idea if this was good, or bad. It was what it was.

But I was intrigued to see my Amazon Author Rank go up. My best rank was #1, but for the past two years I’ve been hovering around #1000. On June 30 I was #854.

Now I hover around #400. I got to #267 last week, and now I’m at #441.

Since I haven’t released any new solo novels in two years (I have three coming out by fall, two Jack Daniels thrillers and a Jack Kilborn horror), the only explanation I have for this jump up was the new KU rules.

By the end of the first week, my daily reads were up to 60,000. By the end of this month, they’re at 85,000.

Now, this all could mean absolutely nothing. Maybe my page reads have remained static, and Amazon’s new accounting system is simply finding its groove.

Maybe people are finishing my books, and the more they read the more they want to read. Or maybe a lot of people are starting them and not finishing them. The likeliest answer is some readers finish, some don’t. Page reads, by themselves, don’t give us enough information.

. . . .

Now, I became a writer via the legacy publishing industry. I collected 500 rejections before I sold a word. For roughly a decade I worked and worked and worked to improve my craft, and when I finally got a pub deal I worked even harder. My publishers gave me feedback. I got better. I attended conferences, and made friends with peers, and we traded WIPs. I got better. By the time this Kindle thing happened, I had a pretty good idea of how to tell an engaging story.

But I never had the opportunity crowdsourcing presents.

While I’ve worked with professional editors and writers, the only true reader feedback I got was from friends and family, and they’re biased. Reviews are feedback after publication, but rarely are they specific enough to help authors (unless the author has really screwed up.)

But if I knew 1000 readers stopped on page 156 of one of my books, and never returned to it, that information would be worth a lot to me.

One of the big advantages to ebooks, which doesn’t get mentioned often, is their fluidity. A paper book pubbed by the Big 5 is static. Once it’s released, that is pretty much the version that exists forever. But ebooks have the ability to update. Change. Improve. Evolve.

We’re on the cusp of an unprecedented level of feedback. These are exciting times. What other medium can tailor its IP to its audience to this degree? Readers don’t like it? Fix it!

. . . .

Now, I invite you to share your KU data. Post anonymously if you feel uncomfortable going public with your numbers. But I’d like to know what your daily page read count was on July 1, and on July 28, and if you notice any upward/downward movement. Also, share your author ranks from those dates, and mention if you’ve released anything new this month.

Link to the rest at Joe Konrath

Here’s a link to Joe Konrath’s books. If you like his posts, you can show your appreciation by buying his books.

Authors United Epic Fail-O-Rama

14 July 2015

Joe Konrath considers the latest whinings to the Justice Department from Authors United, the Authors Guild, the American Booksellers Association and the Association of Authors Representatives:

More nonsense from Authors United.

. . . .

This is a long one, because their letter was so long. And so, so stupid. Tomorrow I’ll spank the Authors Guild, which did something semi-helpful by blogging about ebook royalties, and then stomped on that good faith with awful opinions about piracy, and by endorsing the following nonsense:

Dear Assistant Attorney General Baer:

We believe that Amazon has gathered unprecedented market power over the world of books, which many experts have asserted make it both a monopoly in its role as a seller of books to the public and a monopsony in its role as a buyer of books from publishers. We believe Amazon has been misusing that power in many ways, and we seek the benefit of your office to address this situation.

Amazon is not a monopoly, via Time Magazine:

While Amazon is certainly a large and growing online retailer, even a liberal interpretation of its share of the domestic e-commerce market puts the figure at less than 50%, which is well below the 70% threshold courts typically require as proof of monopoly power. (…) And even if a court found Amazon to possess monopoly power — as one could somewhat realistically claim it does in the e-book market — that’s still only half the battle, as it must also be proved that said power is being exercised to the detriment of consumers.

Lower prices is not to the detriment of consumers.

. . . .

Good luck trying to show that suppliers are being forced to sell ebooks at a loss, which reduces the supply. There are more ebooks available than ever, with more suppliers than ever. Digital media doesn’t subscribe to the rules of supply and demand. Supply is unlimited, because ebooks can be copied and delivered with the press of a button, with low to no overhead other than sunk costs involving the initial production (editing, cover art, formatting, etc.)

The Big 5 are hurting because they are too stupid, lazy, and inefficient to compete. Not because Amazon is controlling them, or anyone else. And, ultimately, pulishers aren’t suppliers. They are middlemen. Writers are the suppliers–something Authors United can’t seem to grasp.

On its current course, Amazon threatens to derail the benefits of a revolution in the way books are created and sold in America. This shift was brought about by two broad innovations. The first is the e-book, the most dramatic new technology in publishing since the invention of the printing press. Because of the low cost of producing and distributing an e-book, many more authors now have the opportunity to self-publish, and millions of people can read books in formats that better fit their pocketbooks and preferences.

The second advance is the e-commerce technology that makes possible on-line bookstores. This techonology has connected readers with a vast selection of physical books, including rare, obscure, and out-of-print volumes. E-commerce has also made it far easier for small publishers to reach customers around the world.

I might be getting ahead of the letter, but apparently Amazon threatens to derail the benefits that Amazon itself–at great cost and risk–revolutionized.

Also, I hope Authors United spell-checked and corrected “techonology” before sending this. Lots of irony in misspelling that…

. . . .

Initially, Amazon deployed these new technologies in ways that benefited both readers and authors. While Amazon did not invent the e-book or e-reader, it created a platform that made it easy for millions around the world to access e-books, including readers who live nowhere near a brick and mortar bookstore.

But as Amazon has become a global corporation of unprecedented size, scope, and power, it is increasingly engaging in practices that undermine the interests of readers, authors, publishers, and society as a whole. Amazon has used the digital revolution in book publishing to exercise control over the marketplace of ideas in ways that threaten not merely open markets but free speech.

And Gutenberg needed to be stopped because he sold more printing presses–you know, that thing he invented–than anyone else.

If by “threatening an open market” they mean “competing better than anyone else” than they are correct.

I’m looking forward to see how Amazon also threatens free speech and the marketplace of ideas. Let’s read on…

While Amazon contends that its goal is to serve consumers by eliminating middlemen in publishing (which it calls the “gatekeepers”), Amazon’s executives have also made clear they intend to make Amazon itself the sole gatekeeper in this industry.

Unlike every other company, which limit themselves to small shares of a marketplace without ever trying to grow. I mean, Coke never tries to take market share from Pepsi. That would be unfair.

But what’s at stake here is not merely monopoly control of a commodity; what is at stake is whether we allow one of the nation’s most important marketplaces of information to be dominated and supervised by a single corporation.

Okay, I think I’m beginning to understand. So many consumers and suppliers use Amazon, freely and by choice, that free speech and ideas will be squelched, because…

Uh…

Because there is no other place to speak freely or exchange ideas. Because Amazon has become the sole omnipotent totalitarian power in the universe, because…

Um…

Because consumers and suppliers freely choose it to be.

Ack. And there are 20 more pages of this crap.

Link to the rest at Joe Konrath

The Path to Success

13 April 2015

From Joe Konrath:

On the surface, the path to becoming a successful writer has three key components.

1. Write a great book.

2. Do whatever you can to make that book a success.

3. Repeat steps 1 and 2.

Like all paths, just because the path exists doesn’t mean you’ll be able to follow it. There are known routes up Mount Everest, but there are no guarantees you’d make the summit no matter how good you are or how hard you try. Even the best mountain climbers must deal with the unpredictability of weather, among many other bad things that can happen.

Luck is always a factor.

Even if you’re an Olympic gold medalist with natural talent and years of training, you were lucky no one was better than you at that time. Because all records get broken. Someone always winds up being better.

. . . .

2. Do whatever you can to make that book a success.

Before you begin this step, you need to identify what your goals are, and what success is.

Then you need to research the different avenues open to you, to pursue goals and success.

It’s different for everyone. And it involves luck.

Again, the more deliberate you are, the better your odds. At least, that makes sense logically. The actual numbers may not hold up. You have to be self-aware to know that.

In other words, you can be pretty damn sure you’re doing everything right, and you can still fail to hit your definition of success.

You should always be able to reach your goals, because goals are within your power. Finishing your book by May 10th is a goal. Self-publishing it by Christmas is a goal.

Getting an agent is a dream, not a goal, because that involves an agent saying yes to you, and that isn’t within your power. Neither is hitting a bestseller list, getting a great review, selling 1000 copies, or getting fan mail. Those aren’t goals.

Your goals, and your definition of success, are plastic. They’ll change. Make sure your goals push you to learn, experiment, practice, and work harder. That should, theoretically, improve your luck and chances at whatever you call success.

As with your writing, this applies to how you promote yourself, your titles, your brand. Try anything and everything. Luck still comes into play, but reason dictates it is better to do something than nothing.

Even though doing something doesn’t guarantee anything.

Yeah, it’s frustrating. So is life.

Link to the rest at Joe Konrath

Here’s a link to Joe Konrath’s books

Ebooks for Libraries

27 March 2015
From Joe Konrath:

TL;DR

  • I want to help authors get their ebooks into libraries.
  • I want to help libraries acquire indie ebooks.
  • To do this, I started a business called EAF – EbooksAreForever.com.
  • I want to sell your ebooks to libraries.

What’s going on with libraries and ebooks?

There are 120,000 libraries in the US. These libraries, and their patrons, are eager for popular ebooks. Many libraries have a budget they must spend, or they risk having that budget cut.

Currently, libraries have no allies in the ebook market. They aren’t happy with the restrictions and costs of the current leader in supplying libraries with ebook content, Overdrive. Through Overdrive, many publishers charge high prices for ebooks, some higher than $80 a title. They also require yearly license renewals, and may force libraries to re-buy licenses after a certain arbitrary number of borrows.

Just one example of the perils of this approach for America’s libraries is that a library must pay for extensions of time-limited licenses of old ebooks and purchases of licenses for new ones. All kinds of sustainability and predictability issues aris

. . . .

Some indies are on Overdrive and 3M. I’ve been on Overdrive for a few years. My last quarterly check was about $60, and I have a large catalog. This is small money, not just for me, but for any writer. And I was fortunate enough to have been invited into Overdrive. Many authors are not.

The vast majority of libraries don’t have access to many of the ebooks that readers are seeking. The latest AuthorEarnings.com report showed that 33% of all ebooks sold on Amazon are from indie authors. Libraries are missing out on 1/3 of available titles, because they have no way easy way to acquire them.

Just as important, these are quality titles. People are reading, enjoying, and recommending them. Indie authors are hooking readers, and selling as well as the major publishing houses, but there isn’t a way for libraries to offer them to their patrons.

. . . .

For the past year, my business partner, August Wainwright, and I have been talking to acquisitions librarians across the country, and they crave an alternative to the status quo. These libraries are looking to buy thousands of ebooks at once in order to best serve their patrons and community.

Their main wish is to be treated fairly – which means they want to own the ebooks they purchase, acquire good content at a reasonable price, and have access to as many copies as they need.

Our solution? Give libraries what they’re asking for, and in a way that gives libraries the sustainable purchasing model they deserve. We’re striving to offer a large, curated collection of popular ebooks that libraries can easily purchase with just one click.

. . . .

EbooksAreForever distributes to libraries at $7.99 for full length novels, and $3.99-$4.99 for shorter works. We’re offering 70% royalties to the author, and the library will have the ability to purchase more copies as needed.

The way this works is that if a library wants to allow 3 patrons to borrow your ebook at any given time, they’d need to have purchased 3 “copies”. Most libraries adhere to a strict hold ratio (usually around 3:1) in order to present patrons with the best user experience possible. Our hope is that by making ebooks both affordable and sustainable, then libraries in response will automatically purchase more copies.

So, if you have a catalog of 10 ebooks that we then distribute to 1000 libraries, you’ve just earned $56,000 in royalties from making your books available to the library marketplace if they each buy one copy. If your titles are popular, they’ll buy more copies and you’ll earn more.

Link to the rest at Joe Konrath and thanks to Sabrina for the tip.

Here’s a link to Joe Konrath’s books

UPDATE: PG put this post together and scheduled it to appear a couple of days ago. He couldn’t figure out why so many people kept sending him tips about Joe’s plan. Then he checked and discovered that WordPress had failed to publish this at the proper time.

On Copyright Again

2 March 2015

From Joe Konrath:

Last summer I wrote about the need to reform copyright.

. . . .

I talked about how fun it would be to write a comic where Superman, Hulk, and Spawn fight, but how that isn’t ever going to happen.

DC owns Superman. Marvel owns Hulk. Image owns Spawn.

Since none of these characters are in the pubic domain, the only way to use them is with a license. But that’s only one level of restriction. Even with an approved license, licencors will have rules. The few existing Marvel-DC/Hulk-Superman fights have been lackluster at best. That’s because the rules imposed by the licensor override any creative freedom on the part of the author/artist.

Writers who work for a specific comic company have rule sheets and bibles for what is allowed and what isn’t. Unless special exceptions are given, there are boundaries. It’s stifling creatively.

. . . .

How interesting it would be if fair use allowed writers to use the IPs of others. Let’s say it was a limited use; maybe 15% of the completed protect. It would still be a game-changer.

. . . .

We live in a world where artists are regularly screwed by publishers, producers, and record labels, but it’s okay because they signed on the dotted line, even though the contract sucked. But then we have a ridiculous double standard, where heirs and companies can hold onto the rights to Mickey Mouse and Sherlock Holmes and Carmina Burana for long after the original artists died.

I know I’m bringing up a lot of ideas here, some of them possibly conflicting, so let me highlight a few points:

  • When an artist dies, any IP they created should revert to heirs.
  • If that IP is currently being exploited by a company (producer, label, publisher) it should still revert. Artist dies, contract is over.
  • Once reverted, heirs are allowed to hold that copyright for a minimal amount of time. Say 40 years. But they don’t have a say in how that copyright is used.
  • Once reverted, any other artist or producer can use that IP in a commercial version of fair-use. I’ll propose that if a certain percentage of the IP is used in a certain percentage of a new work, the heirs get a certain percentage of profits associated with that work, or certain set fees if that work is for advertising purposes.
  • If the artist is still alive, there should still be commercial fair use laws. Perhaps stricter than what the heirs have, but other people should still be able to use what the artist has done. I point to my Jack Daniels & Associates Kindle World as an example of that. Go ahead and use what I created, however you’d like, but pay me some set percentage.

Link to the rest at Joe Konrath

Amazon is the Reader’s Friend . . . or Not

16 January 2015

Video removed because of autoplay annoyances.
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Thanks to Ziv for the tip.

UPDATE: Sorry for the autoplay. The video didn’t do this in PG’s browser. He added autoplay=”false” to the video code which is supposed to turn off autoplay. Since he can’t see whether autoplay is, in fact, now off, drop a comment to let him know what’s going on.

Translating John Sargent

19 December 2014

From Joe Konrath:

Often times it seems as if those who work in the legacy publishing world are so out of touch with authors that a translator is needed to explain the true meaning of what has been said.

Such is the case with John Sargent, CEO of Macmillan, in his recent public letter.

Sargent in crazy bold italics, the translation in common-sense normal font.

Dear Authors, Illustrators, and Agents,

There has been a lot of change in the e-book publishing world of late, so I thought it a good idea to update you on what is going on at Macmillan. 

Translation: It will be easier to accept the bad news if I warn you first.

The largest single change happens today, December 18th. Today a portion of our agreement with the Department of Justice (called a consent decree) expires, and we will no longer be required to allow retailers to discount e-books.

Translation: Remember when we illegally colluded with other publishers to price-fix? We did that because we were worried that low-priced ebooks would harm our paper distribution oligopoly.It doesn’t matter that we have a much higher profit margin on ebooks. It doesn’t matter that since forcing the agency model on Amazon, our authors made less money. What matters is that we foresaw a day where ebook sales surpassed paper sales, and we knew that would put us out of business because savvy authors wouldn’t need our value-added publishing services anymore.Happily, Amazon won’t be able to discount our ebooks anymore, so we can charge high prices and protect the interests of our business and of the cartel at the expense of your financial situation.

. . . .

Simon & Schuster and Macmillan have appealed the court’s decision to extend these dates. This appeal still awaits resolution.

Translation: Money that could have been given to you in the form of higher ebook royalties has been given to lawyers. But the lawyers will hopefully help us ensure that your ebook sales remain low. So why should a low royalty even matter to you? It’s not as if your ebooks are priced to sell in the first place.

. . . .

Irony prospers in the digital age.

Translation: We kinda screwed ourselves.

This odd aberration in the market will cause us to occasionally change the digital list price of your books in what may seem to be random fashion. I ask for your forbearance. We will be attempting to create even pricing as best we can.

Translation: We are attempting to create even pricing with ebooks. With paper, we want Amazon to discount them as much as possible. We’re okay with Amazon undercutting the competition on the price of paper books. That’s a monopoly we want them to have, even if it hurts B&N and indie bookstores. But with ebooks, because we have no distribution oligopoly and are technically not needed by authors, we insist on controlling prices.

. . . .

In our search for new routes to market, we have been considering alternative business models including the subscription model. Many of you know that we have long been opposed to subscription. We have always worried that it will erode the perceived value of your books. Though this significant long-term risk remains, we have decided to test subscription in the coming weeks. 

Translation: Be prepared to make even less money. And we’re doing this even though we’re concerned the perceived value of your books will drop, something often pointed to as the reason we’ve kept ebook prices high. So we’re hypocrites. But it’s okay, because we’re trying to save ourselves.

. . . .

I remain entirely optimistic about our prospects together as we go forward. 

Translation: Macmillan’s prospects. Not the prospects of our writers.

Macmillan owns your rights, and we can do whatever the hell we want with them, and you have no say in it because you signed those rights away to us. Your rights are our sole assets.

We haven’t exploited your rights like we should have, because we were looking at the long game. Ours, not yours.

Looks like the long game won’t pan out. So we’re changing strategies.

You’ll undoubtedly suffer because of this. But you’re used to suffering because of the poor decisions we’ve made.

Hey, at least we’re warning you, right?

. . . .

Joe’s questions for John Sargent on behalf of Macmillan authors:

1. Can I opt out of this new subscription idea?

2. My books aren’t available in print anymore, or the print sales are minuscule. Can you give me my rights back?

3. Why do you think low ebook prices are bad, but a subscription service is a great opportunity?

. . . .

10. You said that this is for books that “are not well represented at bricks and mortar retail stores”. Does that mean no Macmillan bestsellers will be in this subscription program? The rich authors don’t have to deal with this, but I do?

. . . .

14. You said there is a long-term risk that this will devalue my titles, but you’re testing it anyway. Are you going to compensate me in any way to be your guinea pig? A bonus? Higher royalties? Some sort of promotion that features my titles?

. . . .

17. A lot of self-pubbed authors are unhappy with Kindle Unlimited because they’re earning less money. Now you want to force me into similar subscription programs. Do you see my income increasing because of this decision? Because the blogosphere is full of complaints that subscription services aren’t author-friendly, and I’m very concerned.

Link to the rest at Joe Konrath and thanks to Daniel for the tip.

Here’s a link to Joe Konrath’s books

Thoughts on the DBW Writer Survey with Author Lisa Grace

3 December 2014

From Joe Konrath:

Lisa Grace: I asked Joe to please respond to the DBW 2014 survey questions because I just love how he rips through all the *flakes. Many people spout utter nonsense that is meant to slam self-publishing back into a little box marked “they can’t really be doing that well since everyone knows self-publishers really don’t make more than $500 per book, ever” so let’s write a survey that highlights that particular wish-oid (which are related to hemorrhoids.)

Joe: You can see some of the results here, but I’m not going to link to the actual survey because I STRONGLY advise writers not to waste their time with it. If you’re really curious, Google it, but I’m not going to send any writers DBW’s way.

Keep reading on to see why. TL:DR: The DBW survey is damn near worthless.

The survey results are… well… “skewed” would be overly generous. Do you know how lawyers only ask questions they already know the answers to, in order to persuade a judge and jury? And how what is left unsaid is just as important as they way certain questions are phrased? And how they can ask you to reply either “yes” or “no” even though that doesn’t tell the whole story? Add in researcher and response bias, awful and/or incomplete questions, limited and/or missing possible responses, and no random sampling, and welcome to the DBW Survey.

. . . .

Lisa: I just don’t get the point of this survey. Most of the questions, the ones that should be relevant, asked questions relating specifically to the last book published. This is ridiculous. My last book was published on November 12, 2014 (Angel in the Fire, Book 4) and like many others I do a soft launch.

Referring to “the last book published” shows a complete misunderstanding of the fundamental difference between self-publishing and traditional.

This particular book is the fourth in a series. I still sometimes promote the first, and won’t do a large marketing push for another four months when the final book in the series is finished. This is all by design as there is no urgency to promote mid series.

Joe: I had many similar issues, which would lead anyone reading the results to form incorrect conclusions. When this survey is trotted out to prove various points, or its results are cited, be wary.

Here are the survey questions that we thought were problematic, with our fair use critique and comments.

Question: Have you had at least one book published (either traditionally or self-published)?

Lisa: Okay, I thought this survey was for published authors. Yet, a surprising amount of non-published writers are posting.

Survey over for them, right?

If they’ve never published, it’s fairly safe to assume they make zero, and this survey is no longer applicable to them, UNLESS they were going to add some questions (spoiler alert: they don’t) like:

Have you ever queried a traditional publisher?
How many times have you queried traditional advance paying publishers?
How many works/books have you queried publishers with?
How many rejections did you receive on each work?

Now each of these responses should be going into the ZERO made column on the trade side.

Actually, there should be another set of follow-up questions, like:

How much do you estimate you spend in a year on postage, fine linen paper and envelopes, SASEs, paper and toner for your full and partial manuscripts that were rejected?

This of course, puts the trade-pursuing faction in the NEGATIVE column for earnings for the year.

Joe: I used to be known for saying, “There’s a word for a writer who never gives up… published.” Years ago, when publishing was exclusively a lottery/carny game, not every manuscript was published. But this survey allows authors who haven’t even finished a manuscript to provide data. So far, 47% of respondents haven’t complete a book, yet they can still take part of the survey. Who would be interested in that data?

Companies that market products and services to wanna-be authors.

. . . .

Question: About how many hours per week do you spend on OTHER ACTIVITIES RELATED TO WRITING (social networking, marketing your titles, engaging with fans and other writers, etc.)?

Lisa: Again, this is important for those who want to cross-sell services to authors.

Joe: Writing is hard enough! Do you also want to work 250 hours a week running your own business?!?!? We here at Screwya Vanity Press know that you’re an artist who shouldn’t have to get bogged down with all the non-writing parts of the job, so for only $4999 we can do them for you!

This survey is looking less and less like a way to analyze the industry and more and more like a way to survey suckers to better sell them stuff.

Lisa: Or maybe this question is on the survey because trade publishers plan to go back to their authors and say, “Look, they’re spending X hours a week promoting, you should too.”

Link to the rest at Joe Konrath and thanks to James for the tip.

Here’s a link to Joe Konrath’s books and Lisa Grace’s books

Don’t Pay to Self-Publish

24 November 2014

From Joe Konrath:

My name is Joe Konrath, and I write fiction.

I’ve sold over a million books by self-publishing.

You probably were searching for “how to self-publish” or something similar and my blog came up.

This post for all newbie writers considering self-publishing. While it would be extremely helpful to you to take a week and read my entire blog to get a full understanding of how the publishing industry works, here’s the most important thing you need to know:

DON’T PAY ANYONE TO PUBLISH YOU.

Now you can certainly pay people to help you publish. Freelancers such as editors, cover artists, book formatters, proofreaders, and so on.

But when you hire a freelancer to assist you, you keep your rights.

That’s very important.

When you write something, you own the copyright. That’s automatic, even if you don’t register with the copyright office.

Copyright means exactly that; you have the right to copy it, to distribute it, to give it away, to sell it. You own those rights.

But if you pay someone to publish you, you GIVE THEM YOUR RIGHTS.

NEVER GIVE ANYONE YOUR RIGHTS.

. . . .

The truth is, major presses PAY THE AUTHOR, not the other way around.

I have sold books to major publishers, and was paid hundreds of thousands of dollars, and then I had to hire lawyers to get those books back so I could self-publish them. Because I make 10x as much money self-publishing as I did by selling my rights to publishers.

. . . .

Q: I saw an ad for a publisher. Are they legit?

A: Real publishers NEVER advertise. Anywhere. Ever. Not in magazines, or on Facebook, or in Google Ads. NEVER. If they advertise, avoid them.

Q: I saw a publisher at a writing conference and they have publishing packages that they sell.

A: Run away from them. Quickly.

. . . .

Q: But if I pay this publisher, they promise to get me reviews and get my book into Ingram and…

A: DON’T PAY ANYONE TO PUBLISH YOU.

Q: Why not? What’s the big deal?

A: First, they’ll take your money. Probably hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars. Then they’ll keep your rights, so if your book does become successful, they control it, probably forever.

I know a lot of rich self-pubbed authors. Not one of them paid to be published.

Link to the rest at Joe Konrath

Here’s a link to Joe Konrath’s books

The Authors Guild: Do More Than Hope

16 November 2014

From Joe Konrath:

From Authors Guild Prez Roxana Robinson:

“In the meantime, it’s our hope that Hachette—in light of the loyalty its authors have shown throughout this debacle—takes this opportunity to revisit its standard e-book royalty rate of 25% of the publisher’s net profits.”

The Authors Guild has, many times in the past, voiced that ebook royalties should be raised.

So do something about it.

The AG, and Authors United, have been able to get beaucoup media attention during the Hachette/Amazon spat. They were squarely on the side of Hachette (even while proclaiming they weren’t taking sides) and they waged a war for public opinion that did a decent propagandist job of demonizing Amazon.

Now the AG, and all of the bestselling authors who supported AU, need to show some backbone and integrity and use the same tactics to force the Big 5 to raise digital royalties.

Robinson is correct that many authors remained loyal to their publishers. And it makes sense that the loyalty should be rewarded. When a dog does a trick, it gets a treat.

Perhaps the treat will come, and Hachette, after suffering an 18% sales decline during the negotiations, will decide to give away even more profits by raising royalties.

. . . .

If not, the AG and AU should wage a similar public campaign to the one they did against Amazon, and make the world aware that authors earning 1/3 of the digital royalties that publishers earn is lopsided, unfair, and will no lnger be tolerated.

Back in the day before they were called ebooks, and digital rights began to get mentioned in contracts, the Big 6 almost unilaterally came to the conclusion that 25% author royalties were fair.

Where was the AG and the AAR to push back? Not only were digital costs lower–no cost for production or distribution–but the distributor was essentially removed from the money chain. Rather than share this extra money with authors, publishers simply grabbed it.

I’ve done the math in the past. On a $25 hardcover, the author makes about $3.75, and the publisher around $5, after all production, delivery, and middleman costs (distributors and booksellers).

On a $25 ebook, an author makes $4.37, and the publisher $13.12.

Link to the rest at JA Konrath and thanks to SFR for the tip.

Here’s a link to Joe Konrath’s books

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