Kindle

Trigger Warning- Tom and Jerry and Amazon

10 October 2014

You can read about this on any number of sites, but here’s USA Today:

Viewers may now be thinking twice before they click “play” on the classic Warner Bros. cartoon, Tom and Jerry.

Amazon Prime Instant and iTunes have posted a disclaimer that warns users that the cat-and-mouse shorts, which ran from 1940 to 1957, “may depict some ethnic and racial prejudices that were once commonplace in American society.”

The warning continues: “Such depictions were wrong then and are wrong today.”

I have a confession to make. This is so before my time that when I first read the headline (in a different publication) I thought it was because it was a cat and a mouse… living together in sin…

Read the rest here.

Julia

HarperCollins Signs Deal With Bookmate – but Not Kindle Unlimited

9 October 2014

From Nate Hoffelder at The Digital Reader

Bookmate, which is primarily focused on Russia and ebook markets in eastern Europe, will now be able to offer its 1.5 million users ebooks published by HC. No one is talking specifics on the numbers, but the press release does say that “books by hundreds of authors, including CS Lewis are included in the deal”.

. . .

But I will note that Bookmate has a deal which Amazon has not yet secured for Kindle Unlimited. Following the deal between S&S and Denmark-based Mofibo, this is the second time in only a couple weeks that a smaller ebook subscription service scored a contract with a major US trade publisher which Amazon could not get.

. . .

This trend, if it exists, could well explain the speculation that Amazon is about to open up Kindle Unlimited to all KDP authors – with no exclusivity required. This would give Amazon a significantly larger catalog, and what’s more the idea is already getting positive responses from some indie authors.

. . .

Read the full article at The Digital Reader

So far we have only rumors and report of a possible tech glitch to support the opening up of KDP to all indies, but Nate Hoffelder lending weight says it’s still fertile ground for speculation.

Holding-the-digital-fort vacation guest post by Bridget McKenna

 

Bezos synergy

7 October 2014

New Washington Post digital magazine app coming to Kindle Fire

From Tom Cheredar at Venturebeat

The Washington Post, the paper of record for political happenings in the US and beyond, has decided to launch a news application that will appear on the next generation of Amazon Kindle Fire tablets.
The move marks the first time that the Washington Post and Amazon have directly interacted since Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos purchased the newspaper for $25 million in cash last year. The application, which is part of a new “Project Rainbow” initiative at the Post, is expected to appear first on the 8.9-inch Kindle Fire, according to Bloomberg who first reported the news.

****

It’ll be interesting to see if people respond to reading the Post on this new format, especially when there are so many other options available for getting a daily dose of political news. Not only is there a plethora of news organizations willing to offer up their news coverage for free, but also there are plenty of digital magazine apps vying for consumer attention (Pulse, Flipboard, Zite, and News360, to name a few).

Read the rest of the story here.

From Guest Blogger Randall

Maybe the ereader is not dying after all

23 September 2014

If you check on the Kindle Voyage page, you’ll discover that you are limited to purchasing two and Amazon is so backlogged with orders, you’ll have to wait until the week of November 23 to receive yours.

Thanks to Nirmala for the tip.

Amazon Introduces All-New Kindles and New Fire Tablets

17 September 2014

From The Amazon Media Room:

Amazon today introduced the 7th generation of Kindle: Kindle Voyage, our most advanced e-reader ever, and the new $79 Kindle, with a 20% faster processor, twice the storage, and now with a touch interface. Meet the new Kindle and Kindle Voyage at www.amazon.com/kindle-voyage.

“Our mission with Kindle is to make the device disappear, so you can lose yourself in the author’s world,” said Jeff Bezos,Amazon.com Founder and CEO. “Kindle Voyage is the next big step in this mission. With the thinnest design, highest resolution and highest contrast display, reimagined page turns, and all of the features that readers love about Kindle—books in seconds, no eyestrain or glare, readability in bright sunlight, and battery life measured in weeks, not hours—Kindle Voyage is crafted from the ground up for readers.”

. . . .

Kindle Voyage uses a brand new Paperwhite display, with the highest resolution, highest contrast, and highest brightness of any Kindle. With 300 pixels per inch, the new Paperwhite display delivers laser-quality text and images. The exclusive flush-front display stack uses specially strengthened glass, which is designed to resist scratches. Since regular glass would create glare, the cover glass on Kindle Voyage is micro-etched in order to diffuse light, ensuring you can read easily in bright light without glare. The etching pattern on the glass also serves to match the feel of paper.

Adaptive Front Light—Our Smartest Front Light

In addition to being our brightest front light ever—39% brighter—the new adaptive front light automatically adjusts the brightness of the display based on the surrounding light. And because not everyone has the same lighting preferences, the adaptive front light can be fine-tuned to your personal preference. Also, since the human eye adjusts to darkness over time, the light you need when you start reading in the dark will seem too bright 30 minutes later—the adaptive front light slowly lowers the display’s brightness over time to match the way the eye responds to darkness.

. . . .

Kindle—Now With Touch, Just $79

The all-new Kindle includes a 20% faster processor, twice the storage, and now features a touch interface and all of the latest features customers love about Kindle, including Kindle FreeTime, Goodreads, and Smart Lookup. The new Kindle is small, light, and portable—toss it in a beach bag or put it in a pocket to always have your reading with you.

Link to the rest at Amazon Media Room

Amazon also announced a $99 Fire HD tablet, an 8.9 inch Fire HDX tablet and a Fire HD Kids Edition

Kindle security flaw can be exploited by hidden codes in e-books

17 September 2014

From Engadget:

Next time you come across a Kindle e-book link somewhere other than Amazon itself, you may want to make sure it’s not some dubious website before you hit download or “Send to Kindle.” A security researcher by the name of Benjamin Daniel Musser hasdiscovered that the “Manage Your Kindle” page contains a security hole — one that hackers can take advantage of with the help of e-books hiding malicious lines of code. Once you load the Kindle Library with a corrupted e-book (typically with a subject that includes <script src=”https://www.example.org/script.js”></script>), a hacker gets access to your cookies, and, hence, your Amazon account credentials.

Based on the updates Musser wrote at the bottom of the report’s web page, he first discovered the flaw in October last year. Amazon patched it up shortly after he reported it, but it made its way back after a “Manage Your Kindle” overhaul. Still, he believes the issue should be easy to avoid, so long as you don’t download e-books (pirated or otherwise) from websites you don’t know.

Link to the rest at Engadget and thanks to Joshua for the tip.

New Kindle Feature

30 July 2014


New Kindle Helps Readers Show Off By Shouting Title Of Book Loudly And Repeatedly

I’ve a shameful confession to make – I’ve joined the cult of the Kindle

13 July 2014

From The Guardian;

On the day Independent Booksellers Week begins, I feel I should confess: I’ve become a Kindle owner. Look, sometimes these things just happen, OK? It’s not as if I planned it. I started research for a book about the history of children’s literature and was soon faced with a stark choice: disburse money and time I do not have acquiring dozens of early 19th-century tales with titles such as The History Of The Crumbshaw Family and How God Smote Them All, Starting With The Baby, As Painfully As He Could For Bogglingly Minor Transgressions; or download free versions in seconds on to a portable device that would obviate both.

So I bought it for work. But there’s been mission creep. I discovered that because you don’t need to hold it open, you can easily read during meals (no more wedging of book under plate and destabilising your dinner), while drying your hair/dishes and through many other tediously necessary parts of life. You can read in bed even after your other half has demanded lights out, because it provides its own illumination.

. . . .

Of course, you don’t want to be reading stuff for work all the time, so I started downloading other books, too. Plus shelving space is at a premium in this already bibliographically-overstuffed house, so saving a few inches – well, a few feet now – is A Good Thing, too.

. . . .

The smooth affectlessness of the screen is pervasive. The ticker in the corner that tells you what percentage of the book you have left, and how long it will – could? should? – take to finish, turns reading into a race against the clock, while the value of being able to look up words and other people’s notes must be set against the way their presence divides the mind against itself and pitches the reader perennially out of the moment.

Link to the rest at The Guardian and thanks to Robert for the tip.

A U.S. ambassador was just sworn in on a Kindle

3 June 2014

From The Washington Post:

Paper books are on the decline. In 2008, the market for consumer print books was north of $15 billion. Now it’s more like $10 billion — and that number is expected to continue falling until it reaches parity with e-book sales at about  $8 billion in 2017.

It’s no surprise that with e-books on the rise, more and more public officials will be sworn in on them. On Monday, Suzi LeVine became the first U.S. ambassador to be sworn in on an e-reader:

LeVine took the oath on a digital copy of the U.S. Constitution stored on a Kindle Touch. But that’s not the only time a digital device has replaced its dead-tree predecessor.

Link to the rest at The Washington Post and thanks to William for the tip.

PG has no idea what effect this will have on those who suffer from Amazon Derangement Syndrome.

Whither the Kindle Killer?

30 May 2014

From Chris Meadows at TeleRead:

Larry Press plaintively wonders why nobody’s come up with a “Kindle Killer” yet. He notes a whole host of ways the Kindle falls short of perfection—lack of voice recognition or full interface capability with a computer, for example—and thinks such a device really should be a “low-hanging fruit” for one of the big device makers.

I’ll tell you why, Larry. The demand isn’t there. Maybe folks like you who like to get the most out of their devices would want such a thing, but the vast majority of the lowest-common-denominator general public—the ones who actually buy the devices in bulk—are happy as hogs in a trough with their Kindles the way they are, or else they wouldn’t be as popular as they are.

I don’t think Amazon gets nearly enough credit for the amazing thing it did with the Kindle. It’s one of those things that looks easy, because it made e-reading easy. But how many of you remember what e-reading used to be like before Amazon came along? You had to piddle around with side-loading stuff onto PDAs or e-ink readers, hooking them up to the computer, using conduit software to pipe the stuff on, and so on and so forth.

. . . .

Amazon came along, built cellular connectivity into its Kindles so you didn’t even have to figure out how to connect them to wi-fi, and made it so you click a button, you get a book. Boom. Dead simple. Anyone can do it. And Amazon was the first to make that possible. Anybody elsecould have done it, if they’d thought of it, but they didn’t think of it. Jeff Bezos did, and the first-mover advantage was enormous.

. . . .

So, no, it’s not DRM that keeps users locked into the Kindle store. It’s a contributing factor, but it’s not the only factor. If all the publishers stopped using DRM tomorrow and set up stores of their own to bypass Amazon, I’ll bet the vast majority of Kindle-owning customers would still buy from Amazon anyway. And if a given publisher dropped Amazon in favor of its own DRM-free store (or for that matter Amazon dropped them), they would complain to the publisher that they’re “not on Kindle” and just wouldn’t buy those e-books.

Link to the rest at TeleRead

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