Yearly Archives: 2019

Bookstores in Movies – 7

15 June 2019

84 Charing Cross Road

From IMDB:

1949 marks the beginning of the nineteen year (1949 to 1968) unconventional and long distance love affair between Helene Hanff (Anne Bancroft) and Frank P. Doel (Sir Anthony Hopkins). Straightforward Helene is an aspiring New York City-based writer who works as a script editor. She is a voracious reader, especially of non-fiction. Frank is the efficient and knowledgeable head clerk at Marks & Co., a second-hand bookstore located at 84 Charing Cross Road in London. Unable to find the out of print books she wants at New York City bookstores without having to pay an arm and a leg, which she can’t afford, she writes to Marks & Co. hoping they can fill her order at reasonable prices. Frank and the bookstore staff are able to provide Helene most of what she wants at more than reasonable prices including shipping. As such, she provides them with standing orders for more and more books. But as time goes on, their correspondence not only deals with Helene’s orders, but what is happening in their lives and in the world around them, Frank’s, which includes his loving marriage to his wife Nora (Dame Judi Dench) and their two children. Helene dreams one day of being able to travel to London to meet Frank and the other Marks & Co. staff, the people who have been able to fulfill a great need in her life.

Link to the rest at IMDB

Bookstores in Movies – 6

15 June 2019

Crossing Delancy

From IMDB:

Isabelle (Amy Irving) is a young independent woman who works in a bookstore. She meets regularly with her friends, and often goes to visit and spends time with her Jewish grandmother (wonderfully played by Reizl Bozyk), or bubbie as she calls her, who thinks its sad that she doesn’t have a man in her life. Trying to do something about that, her grandmother hires a marriage broker, and Isabelle ends up getting fixed up with a guy who sells pickles, Sam Posner (Peter Riegert). Isabelle is not very happy about it to begin with, since she is interested in the writer Anton Maes (Jeroen Krabbé), who does readings at the bookstore she works in. She is not very interested in Sam to begin with, and declines his offer to take her out when they meet for the first time at her grandmothers apartment. Sam is very persistent though, and Isabelle starts to warm up to him slowly as he woos his way into her heart. Still being very interested in Anton Maes, she fixes Sam up with her best friend Ricky. A good idea to begin with, but as Isabelle starts to like Sam more and more and discovers that maybe Anton Maes isn’t that great, she starts spending more time with Sam.

Link to the rest at IMDB

Bookstores in Movies – 5

15 June 2019

The Bookshop

From IMDB:

England, 1959. Free-spirited widow Florence Green (Emily Mortimer) risks everything to open a bookshop in a conservative East Anglian coastal town. While bringing about a surprising cultural awakening through works by Ray Bradbury and Vladimir Nabokov, she earns the polite but ruthless opposition of a local grand dame (Patricia Clarkson) and the support and affection of a reclusive book loving widower (Bill Nighy). As Florence’s obstacles amass and bear suspicious signs of a local power struggle, she is forced to ask: is there a place for a bookshop in a town that may not want one? Based on Penelope Fitzgerald’s acclaimed novel and directed by Isabel Coixet (Learning to Drive), The Bookshop is an elegant yet incisive rendering of personal resolve, tested in the battle for the soul of a community.

Link to the rest at IMDB

Bookstores in Movies – 4

15 June 2019

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

From IMDB:

It’s Year 2 at Hogwarts, and Harry Potter, Ron, and Hermione are back learning, but their year doesn’t go passed quietly. Members of the school are turning up petrified and bloody writings are appearing on the walls, revealing to everyone, that someone has opened the Chamber of Secrets. The attacks continue, bringing the possibility of the closure of Hogwarts. Harry and his friends are now forced to secretly uncover the truth about the chamber before the school closes or any lives are taken.

Link to the rest at IMDB

Bookstores in Movies – 3

15 June 2019

Notting Hill

From IMDB:

William Thacker (played by Hugh Grant) is a bookseller at a shop in the Notting Hill district in West London, who shares a house with an eccentric Welsh friend, Spike (Rhys Ifans). One day, William is minding the store when in strolls Anna Scott (Julia Roberts), a lovely and well-known actress from the United States who is in London working on a film. She buys a book from William, and she is polite and charming in the way a famous actress would be with a star-struck sales clerk. Their relationship would logically end there, if William didn’t run out a few minutes later to buy some juice. While dashing back to the shop, he bumps into Anna on the street, spilling juice all over her blouse. Since he lives nearby, William politely offers to let her stop by his house to clean up; since William seems harmless enough, Anna agrees. When Anna has to stop back to pick up a bag she left at William’s house, they kiss — just in time for Spike to show up. A romance slowly blooms as his friends and family (not to mention the world at large) wonder out loud what he’s doing dating a movie star.

Link to the rest at IMDB

Bookstores in Movies – 2

15 June 2019

The Big Sleep

From IMDB:

Private detective Philip Marlowe is hired by old General Sternwood to stop a blackmail attempt concerning his youngest daughter Carmen. Marlowe tails the blackmailer Geiger to his house at Laverne Terrace. Suddenly he hears a shot and sees some men rushing out to their cars. He breaks into the house and finds Carmen drugged in a chair, with Geiger’s dead body at her feet. An empty camera proves that a photo has been taken of her and the corpse, probably intended for further blackmailing. A series of clues lead Marlowe to various people involved in gambling. Wherever he finds them, he also finds Sternwood’s oldest daughter Vivian Rutledge, a divorced beauty. She and Marlowe fall in love, although she continues double-crossing him. When Marlowe’s investigations lead him to the casino owner Eddie Mars, the situation becomes very dangerous. Everyone, including the district attorney, advises Marlowe to stop the investigation, but he is stubborn. Eddie Mars has many of henchmen who do his dirty jobs, including murder. But Marlowe decides to set up a trap for Mars himself.

Link to the rest at IMDB

Bookstores in Movies – 1

15 June 2019

The Ninth Gate

From IMDB:

In New York, the money-driven dealer Dean Corso is a rare-books expert and partner of Bernie, who owns a bookstore. He is contacted by the renowned collector of books about the devil Boris Balkan, who has just acquired the rare The Nine Gates of the Kingdom of Shadows from the collector Andrew Telfer, to verify whether his book is authentic or a forgery. Balkan explains that the book was written by the writer Aristide Torchia, in 1666, with Lucifer and he was burned at the stake with his entire work. There are only three exemplars of The Nine Gates and in accordance with the legend, its nine engravings form a riddle to conjure the devil.

Link to the rest at IMDB

So Much Love for Library Book Groups!

15 June 2019

From ALA Journal:

I have a confession to make. I used to think that participation in public library book groups would be somewhat transient—people would drop in for a few months while they decided if they liked the concept, at which point they’d go off and join a private group, or start their own.

How wrong I was! BookBrowse.com, my online magazine for booklovers, recently released a report on the dynamics of book groups: The Inner Lives of Book Clubs. One of the significant findings of the report reflects how much people love their library book groups and how loyal they are to them.

  • Statistically speaking, there is barely a difference between happiness in public groups compared to private ones: 71% of those in public book clubs (most of which meet in libraries) say they are very happy in their group, 24% say they are somewhat happy.
  • 69% of those in public groups say their book club is “very important” to them—the exact same percentage as in private groups.
  • 57% of respondents in public book clubs (most of which meet in libraries) have been with their group at least five years!

The research shows that public library book clubs are a great fit for many who are looking to join a book group. For example:

Diversity
When we ask people interested in joining a book club to describe their ideal group, some say they would like an all-women group (“mansplaining” came up more than once), but most women and almost all men would prefer a diverse group with people of different ages and genders, and from a variety of backgrounds. When we look at the profile of public book clubs compared to private groups, we see that the latter tend to be more homogeneous. For example, when asked to approximate the age range in their book club, 39% of those in public groups estimated a spread of at least 20 years, compared to 17% in private groups. And when we look at gender, we find that 88% of private book clubs are all women, whereas about half of public groups have a mix of sexes.

. . . .

A Focus on Discussion
Many people who don’t have book club experience have the common misconception that book clubs are just an excuse for a night of gossip and a glass or two of wine; but, in fact, 84% of those we surveyed are in groups that spend at least 40 minutes of each meeting on book discussion. Additionally, statistically speaking, the longer the discussion, the happier the membership: 55% of respondents in groups that generally discuss the book for 20 minutes or less say they are “very happy” in their group, compared to 73% in groups that discuss for 50-60 minutes, and 81% in groups that discuss for 75 minutes or more.

Socializing is important to many—43% of those in public book clubs and 71% of those in private groups say that socializing before or after the discussion is very important to them; and most who wish to join a book group would like there to be a social element. But the great majority are clear that their primary interest is the book discussion itself. A core reason for this, as many observe, is that it is through the deep discussion of a book that one can get to know people in ways that are not always possible in a purely social setting. So, the public book group format—generally meeting for 60 to 90 minutes and spending most of that time on discussion—is an attractive proposition for many. And of course, people are free to socialize before and after the meeting if they wish.

Link to the rest at ALA Journal

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