The Passive Voice https://www.thepassivevoice.com A Lawyer's Thoughts on Authors, Self-Pub and Traditional Publishing Fri, 27 Mar 2020 22:15:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://www.thepassivevoice.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Small-PV-Icon-150x132.png The Passive Voice https://www.thepassivevoice.com 32 32 Sovereign immunity https://www.thepassivevoice.com/sovereign-immunity/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=sovereign-immunity https://www.thepassivevoice.com/sovereign-immunity/#respond Fri, 27 Mar 2020 22:15:43 +0000 https://www.thepassivevoice.com/?p=122852 Read more]]> From The Legal Information Institute:

The sovereign immunity refers to the fact that the government cannot be sued without its consent. 

. . . .

Sovereign immunity was derived from British common law doctrine based on the idea that the King could do no wrong. In the United States, sovereign immunity typically applies to the federal government and state government, but not to municipalities. Federal and state governments, however, have the ability to waive their sovereign immunity. The federal government did this when it passed the Federal Tort Claims Act, which waived federal immunity for numerous types of torts claims. 

. . . .

When determining whether a citizen may sue a state actor (someone acting on behalf of the state: i.e. a state worker), courts will typically use one (1) of four (4) tests:

  1. Governmental v proprietary function test (Was the actor functioning in a governmental fashion or a proprietary fashion?)
    1. If the actor was performing a proprietary function (i.e. acting for financial gain for itself or its citizens; doing something that is not historically a governmental function; doing something that can be performed by a private corporation/contractor), then the actor is subject to liability
    2. If the actor was performing a governmental function (i.e. acting for the general public; doing something ordained by legislature; performing a historic gov function), then the actor is not subject to liability
  2. Ministerial/operational v. discretionary functions/acts test (Was the actor performing a ministerial/operational task or a discretionary task?) 
    1. If the actor is performing a ministerial/operational action, then there is not immunity. 
    2. If the actor is performing a discretionary action, then there is immunity.
  3. Planning v implementational (Was the actor planning an action or implementing an action?)
    1. If the actor’s planning of policy results in harm, then there is immunity
    2. If the harm happens due to the government’s implementation of the plan, then there is not immunity  
  4. Non-justiciable v. justiciable
    1. If the action is justiciable under regular tort principles, then there is no immunity. If the issue is not justiciable under regular tort principles, then there is immunity.

Link to the rest at The Legal Information Institute

And, since you were curious about what justiciabile means:

Justiciability refers to the types of matters that a court can adjudicate.  If a case is “nonjusticiable,” then the court cannot hear it. Typically to be justiciable, the court must not be offering an advisory opinion, the plaintiff must have standing, and the issues must be ripe but neither moot nor violative of the political question doctrine. Typically, these issues are all up to the discreion of the court which is adjudicating the issue. 

More about justiciability at The Legal Information Institute

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States Are Immune from Copyright Suits https://www.thepassivevoice.com/states-are-immune-from-copyright-suits/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=states-are-immune-from-copyright-suits https://www.thepassivevoice.com/states-are-immune-from-copyright-suits/#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2020 22:02:11 +0000 https://www.thepassivevoice.com/?p=122850 Read more]]> From The Authors Guild:

On Monday, March 23, the U.S. Supreme Court held that states are immune from copyright liability. This is troubling because it means that state universities and libraries can abuse copyright as much as they want without liability to publishers or authors. The Court’s decision in Allen v. Cooper invalidated a 1990 amendment to the Copyright Act which had allowed copyright holders to sue states for copyright infringement.

In Allen v. Cooper, plaintiff Allen and his production company were photographers with exclusive rights to document the exploration of the pirate Blackbeard’s shipwrecked vessel, but the state of North Carolina used Allen’s photographs and videos without his consent. Although the parties entered into a settlement agreement requiring the state to compensate Allen, Allen found out that the state had continued to use the copyrighted works after the date of the settlement agreement. The Supreme Court dubbed the alleged copyright infringement “a modern form of piracy.”

. . . .

While it found that states are immune (again) from copyright infringement actions, the Supreme Court nevertheless left a legislative door open: “That conclusion, however, need not prevent Congress from passing a valid copyright abrogation law in the future.” The Court recognized the need to protect the interests of copyright holders—even from the states—saying “That kind of tailored statute can effectively stop States from behaving as copyright pirates. Even while respecting constitutional limits, it can bring digital Blackbeards to justice.”

Link to the rest at The Authors Guild

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The World of Books Braces for a Newly Ominous Future https://www.thepassivevoice.com/the-world-of-books-braces-for-a-newly-ominous-future-2/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-world-of-books-braces-for-a-newly-ominous-future-2 https://www.thepassivevoice.com/the-world-of-books-braces-for-a-newly-ominous-future-2/#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2020 21:57:06 +0000 https://www.thepassivevoice.com/?p=122846 Read more]]> From The New York Times:

In these isolated times, many people are inside reading, but the book business, like others, is bracing for catastrophe. Major literary festivals and fairs around the world have been canceled. Public libraries have closed. Author tours, signings and bookstore appearances have been scrapped.

As the severity of the coronavirus outbreak continues to intensify, authors, publishers and booksellers are struggling to confront and limit the financial fallout. Many fear the worst is yet to come, including more store closures and potential disruptions to warehouse and distribution centers, as well as possible paper shortages and a decline in printing capacity.

“There’s no question we’re going to see a drop in sales,” said Dennis Johnson, co-publisher of the Brooklyn-based independent press Melville House, who has directed staff to work from home. “It’s unprecedented. Nobody knows what to do except hoard Purell.”

. . . .

The potential long-term effects for book retailers are sobering. Many in the industry are worried that independent bookstores will be devastated as local and state officials mandate social distancing and order some businesses to temporarily close.

. . . .

Mitchell Kaplan, the founder of Books & Books, an independent chain in South Florida, said sales have fallen at the company’s stores and cafes, and author appearances have been canceled.

“The irony of all this is that what makes bookstores so potent, our ability to be community gathering places, has become our biggest liability,” he said.

. . . .

Some independent booksellers, including Powell’s, have already begun cutting staff. On Monday, Powell’s announced to employees that it will begin involuntary layoffs after determining the minimum number of employees it needs to keep the online store functioning. A representative of the local union that represents 400 Powell’s workers said that about 85 percent of them had already been affected by temporary layoffs, and that the company has signaled that permanent layoffs are likely to follow.

McNally Jackson, an independent chain in New York, let a substantial number of its employees go after deciding to shutter its stores for the time being. On Twitter, the company said it had temporarily laid off many of its staffers while “facing down a massive, unprecedented loss in revenue,” and added that “we intend to hire back our employees as soon as we can.” A note on the company’s website said that it is still accepting phone and online orders while the stores are closed, and offering delivery.

. . . .

The American Booksellers Association said it has been lobbying publishers to support independent stores by offering discounts, free shipping to customers and a removal of the cap on returns of unsold titles, among other measures. Other groups have been raising money to donate to hard-hit independent stores. The Book Industry Charitable Foundation, which gives financial support to independent stores, released a statement offering potential assistance to stores that have been impacted by the epidemic and are unable to pay their rent or utilities bills as a result of lost sales.

Still, many in the industry worry that financial losses stemming from the outbreak will cripple a significant number of stores and cause them to close permanently. Others fear that the lockdowns and government guidelines mandating social distancing will give an even greater advantage to Amazon as more homebound customers turn to internet shopping.

. . . .

The art critic Jerry Saltz was scheduled to launch his new book, “How to Be An Artist,” at the Strand in New York on Tuesday, but will instead appear in a livestream conversation broadcast on the store’s Instagram account, which has 225,000 followers.

Some stores see virtual events as the best alternative for the foreseeable future, and perhaps the only way to stay connected with readers and their communities as more physical spaces are forced to close.

Politics and Prose, in Washington, is aiming to turn all of its scheduled author appearances into virtual events, with writers hosting a conversation about their books remotely by web video through the platform Crowdcast. “Authors are self-isolating along with the rest of us,” said Liz Hottel, the director of events and marketing at Politics and Prose. “I’m sure they are as starved for meaningful dialogue as readers are.”

Link to the rest at The New York Times

PG notes that there is nothing that prevents indie authors from using web video to promote their books in the same manner as described in the OP.

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Women Authors Lead Literary Fiction Books Sales in the U.S. https://www.thepassivevoice.com/women-authors-lead-literary-fiction-books-sales-in-the-u-s/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=women-authors-lead-literary-fiction-books-sales-in-the-u-s https://www.thepassivevoice.com/women-authors-lead-literary-fiction-books-sales-in-the-u-s/#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2020 21:46:53 +0000 https://www.thepassivevoice.com/?p=122843 Read more]]> From Yahoo Finance:

According to global information company The NPD Group, 67 percent of unit sales in the top 100 literary fiction books in 2019 came from books written by female authors. The top fiction title of the year was “Where the Crawdad’s Sing,” by Delia Owens, selling more than 1.2 million print copies.

“March is Women’s History Month, which makes it the perfect time to review the many contributions of women authors to the U.S. publishing industry,” said Kristen McLean, books industry analyst for NPD. “Women have increased their share of bestsellers in the last decade, particularly when it comes to fiction.”

Women authors’ influence in publishing varies by category

Women authors were responsible for 42 percent of unit sales for the top 100 books in the overall print book market in 2019—up from 30 percent in 2010. Last year 39 of the top 100 bestselling authors were women, up from 33 in 2010. In fact, over the 16 years NPD BookScan has been tracking the U.S. publishing market, the bestselling author is a woman. Total sales of all of J.K. Rowling’s “Harry Potter” series exceeded 55 million copies, across more than 300 editions of her many titles for children and adults.

Combined unit sales of books with a focus on subjects about, and of interest to, women have enjoyed seven consecutive years of growth; and women-related subcategories have been responsible for overall growth of a wide variety of publishing areas. Women-related subcategories in comics and graphic novels, drama, history, poetry, and political and social science collectively increased 7 percent in 2019 over the previous year.

Link to the rest at Yahoo Finance

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Video game makers free to use NBA stars’ tattoos https://www.thepassivevoice.com/video-game-makers-free-to-use-nba-stars-tattoos/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=video-game-makers-free-to-use-nba-stars-tattoos https://www.thepassivevoice.com/video-game-makers-free-to-use-nba-stars-tattoos/#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2020 21:42:32 +0000 https://www.thepassivevoice.com/?p=122841 Read more]]> From World Intellectual Property Review:

Depicting sports stars’ tattoos in video games does not infringe copyright owned by the tattoo artist or their licensee, a US federal court has ruled.

In the first written judgment on tattoo copyright in the US, the US District Court for the Southern District of New York yesterday, March 26, ruled that video game developer and publisher Take-Two Interactive was free to reproduce the designs featured in the real-life tattoos of basketball players like LeBron James in its “NBA 2K” series.

Take-Two, and its subsidiary 2K, had been facing copyright infringement claims brought by Solid Oak Sketches, a tattoo licensing firm which purchased the copyright for James’ tattoos, as well as other basketball players Eric Bledsoe and Kenyon Martin.

. . . .

According to the court, when artists tattoo someone, they grant an implied, nonexclusive licence to their work where it can be reasonably expected to become part of a person’s likeness.

In the case of the basketball players, the artists would have known that they were well-known figures and likely to appear in public, on TV, and in the media.

“Defendants’ right to use the tattoos in depicting the players derives from these implied licenses, which predate the licenses that plaintiff obtained from the tattooists,” judge Laura Swain wrote.

. . . .

Irrespective of the implied licence, the reproduction of the tattoos in the “NBA 2K” games qualified as de minimis use, and did not require the consent of any copyright owner, the court concluded.

Judge Swain wrote that “no reasonable trier of fact could find the tattoos as they appear in ‘NBA 2K’ to be substantially similar to the tattoo designs licensed to Solid Oak,” as they cannot be identified or observed during gameplay.

The court found that the tattoos appear only fleetingly and are obscured by the rapid motions of the in-game players. 

Link to the rest at World Intellectual Property Review

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The Renaissance https://www.thepassivevoice.com/the-renaissance/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-renaissance https://www.thepassivevoice.com/the-renaissance/#respond Fri, 27 Mar 2020 21:24:41 +0000 https://www.thepassivevoice.com/?p=122839

The Renaissance took place in chaos and plague.

~ Shiva Ayyadurai

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When Should Writers Incorporate or Create an LLC? https://www.thepassivevoice.com/when-should-writers-incorporate-or-create-an-llc/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=when-should-writers-incorporate-or-create-an-llc https://www.thepassivevoice.com/when-should-writers-incorporate-or-create-an-llc/#comments Thu, 26 Mar 2020 21:28:22 +0000 https://www.thepassivevoice.com/?p=122837 Read more]]> Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer or CPA. So I’m not in a position to give individualized and specific legal or tax advice. This article is meant to give general guidance on considerations. However, it would make sense to consult a lawyer and CPA before acting on this general guidance, because benefits and drawbacks will change from state to state.

With that out of the way, this is one of those questions I receive every so often from writers. In most cases, the writers are not earning a significant income from their writing yet, but I get it. I’m a writer too, and I feel like writers are especially gifted at dreaming up possibilities—both good and bad.

. . . .

Reasons I’ve heard writers give for incorporating or forming an LLC usually have to do with protection. Some people have heard that incorporating as an S Corp or creating an LLC will protect them from lawsuits and provide tax benefits.

. . . .

One reason writers give for considering incorporating or creating an LLC is to put a wall between their freelance business and personal assets. On its surface, it sounds like a good reason. However, the most common liability for writers is different than other businesses that have employees, investments in production, and other business costs.

The most common liabilities for writers are tied to possible lawsuits for defamation, privacy, or infringement. In all those cases, plaintiffs would likely file suits against both the company and the writer. This is why most publishing contracts have language to cover them against the actions of their writers.

The good news is that you’re not completely helpless if this is a concern for you. Writers can look into Business Liability and/or Media Liability insurance policies. If you go this route, be sure that your policy covers defamation, privacy, and infringement claims.

Link to the rest at Writers Digest

PG will provide a bullet point response:

  • Get tax advice from a CPA or qualified tax accountant, not another writer. Some writers won’t gain any tax benefit from a corporation or LLC (Limited Liability Companies – they are definitely not the same when it comes to taxes) while other writers will.
    • Is the writer married? Does the spouse have an income?
    • Does either the writer or the spouse own assets not related to writing?
    • Does the author live in a community property state?
    • Are inheritance or estate taxes going to be involved if the author dies while married? Unmarried?
  • Get legal advice from a lawyer, not another writer.
    • Laws relating to defamation, privacy, or infringement claims vary, sometimes substantially, from state to state.
    • There are very good reasons that many corporations, including most very large corporations, incorporate in Delaware rather than the state in which most of the corporation’s assets exist. (About two-thirds of Fortune 500 companies are Delaware corporations.)
    • There are very good reasons why many LLCs (and an increasing number of closely-held corporations) are formed in Nevada even though the parties creating them and the assets of these entities are outside of Nevada.
    • Laws relating to the types of third-party claims from which an LLC or corporation may shield a shareholder of a corporation or owner of an LLC interest vary from state to state.
    • More than one lawsuit has been avoided or won because of legal speed bumps lying between the claimant and an award of damages.
      • As an example, if a plaintiff lives in Illinois and the defendant/author contends a Nevada LLC owns the copyright to the book involved and the LLC files a proceeding in Nevada against the plaintiff claiming improper actions on the part of the Illinois plaintiff and that Nevada, not Illinois, is the only proper place to pursue the litigation of the claims of the LLC, at a minimum, it is almost certain the plaintiff will need to hire a Nevada attorney to respond.
      • There are many, many other potential speed bumps between a complaint and cash in the plaintiff’s pocket that a determined author and competent counsel can place create. This is one reason why many litigation attorneys require a substantial up-front payment from an individual plaintiff and will not take a case on a contingency fee basis unless there is an insurance company or some other deep pocket who will pay if the judgment goes against them. You can assume that 99.999% of the attorneys who advertise on television fall into that category.

Finally, PG notes that he is a member of The State Bar of California and claims no legal or professional expertise with respect to the tax laws of any government entity nor the laws of Illinois, Delaware or Nevada. If you wish to understand tax laws, you need to hire a competent accountant or tax attorney and if you wish to understand the laws, including the corporation and LLC laws and the laws and court rules relating to litigation in a state, you need to hire a competent attorney who is admitted to practice law in that state.

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India’s Juggernaut Opens #ReadInstead, a Campaign and Literature Fest https://www.thepassivevoice.com/indias-juggernaut-opens-readinstead-a-campaign-and-literature-fest/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=indias-juggernaut-opens-readinstead-a-campaign-and-literature-fest https://www.thepassivevoice.com/indias-juggernaut-opens-readinstead-a-campaign-and-literature-fest/#comments Thu, 26 Mar 2020 19:41:30 +0000 https://www.thepassivevoice.com/?p=122832 Read more]]> From Publishing Perspectives:

Known in the industry as one of world publishing’s most resourceful thinkers, New Delhi’s Chiki Sarkar has alerted Publishing Perspectives this morning (March 26) to her sure-footed adaptation to the COVID-19 crisis.

“As you know,” she says, “the coronavirus has closed down print business–so that part of our business is making zero money, as it is for all Indian publishers.”

Indeed, as Jeffrey Gettleman and Kai Schultz have reported at The New York Times, India’s prime minister Narendra Modi gave his nation just four hours’ notice before locking down all 11.3 billion people for three full weeks, “the biggest and most severe action undertaken anywhere to stop the spread of the coronavirus.”

. . . .

So it is that in announcing the shuttering of India on Tuesday night, Modi said, “There will be a total ban on coming out of your homes … Every state, every district, every lane, every village will be under lockdown.”

Sarkar, whose Juggernaut publishing company is two years old and presents more than 5,000 titles by some 2,000 authors, is, fortunately, a publisher whose grasp of digital marketing capabilities has defined her success. Supported by her CEO Simran Khara and a strong editorial staff, she’s been carefully watched for her understanding that making books less intimidating to many in her culture has meant also making Internet retail and development less intimidating in a tradition-bound industry.

You see how she puts across an aggressive appeal to readers on her site. The first banner in her slider at the top is a massive ad for a book offering the World Health Organization’s guidelines on safety in the pandemic. And after a single line of “Readers Club New Releases,” she’s showing potential customers an entire “COVID-19 Reading List.”

This is the sort of adaptive, social response she uses to reach into consumer interests, and as her enormous market’s physical retail channels went dark on Wednesday morning—and with some foresight—Sarkar was positioned to take advantage of her online fluency.

“Last week,” as the contagion’s approach grew, she tells us, “we initiated a massive #ReadInstead campaign.

“We made our app go free, which has been huge for us. Our installs doubled and our ebook downloads have grown four times. The campaign is also being extremely well received on social media.

. . . .

With the #ReadInstead campaign moving, she says, “We launched a massive online literature festival with Scroll.in“–the news and entertainment site that registers a reported 12 million unique users’ visits daily.

. . . .

The festival opens Friday (March 27), and Sarkar says, “We’ll run it for a month, and most of India’s top writers are taking part. The festival has talks, dialogues, and writing workshops, and some of India’s most respected actors are doing readings.”

She’s not kidding about the level. Author Amish Tripathi—who can pull seven-figure advances for his work based in Indian mythology—leads an impressive array of authors whose headshots have gone up in advance of a timed announcement coordinated with Scroll.in.

Link to the rest at Publishing Perspectives

PG noted the statement that ebook downloads have increased four-fold.

Given the lack of perceptible marketing (and marketing talent) in American publishing, particularly now, it was nice to see some innovative promotion and marketing on the part of an Indian publisher in the face of difficult business conditions. Not all publishing minds are sheltering in place.

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Lady in Waiting: Self-Portrait of a Lady https://www.thepassivevoice.com/lady-in-waiting-self-portrait-of-a-lady/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=lady-in-waiting-self-portrait-of-a-lady https://www.thepassivevoice.com/lady-in-waiting-self-portrait-of-a-lady/#respond Thu, 26 Mar 2020 18:22:41 +0000 https://www.thepassivevoice.com/?p=122829 Read more]]> From The Wall Street Journal:

Lady Anne Glenconner, the 87-year-old daughter of the Earl of Leicester, came from a generation and a class that were not brought up to express emotion. “There were no heart-to-hearts” and no self-pity was allowed, she writes in “Lady in Waiting: My Extraordinary Life in the Shadow of the Crown.” You didn’t “dwell.” You kept the proverbial stiff upper lip. And, as her stalwart and disarmingly honest book testifies, that is what she did. Nevertheless, emotion resonates through this delightful memoir, which offers a candid, humorous look inside the royal family and the daft world of the British aristocracy.

Born Anne Veronica Coke, she grew up in one of Britain’s greatest manor houses, Holkham Hall, a North Norfolk estate she couldn’t inherit because she was female. (It went to a cousin.) Her father, she writes, “was not affectionate or sentimental, and did not share his emotions. No one did, not even my mother.” In 1939, at the outbreak of war, he was posted to Egypt with the Scots Guards. Anne and her younger sister, Carey, were sent to live with their cousins in Scotland. They didn’t see their parents for three years. Her mother never knew that Anne’s governess bound her hands to the back of the bed every night (the woman was eventually sacked, not for child abuse but because she was a Roman Catholic).

At Holkham Hall, Anne began a close friendship with Princess Margaret when, as children, they would jump out from behind the curtains to scare the footmen. Reunited at Anne’s coming-out dance in 1950, they chatted until the sun rose over the front portico. Three years later, Anne was picked to be one of six maids of honor at Queen Elizabeth II’s coronation, a ceremony Anne describes with starry-eyed detail (ivory silk dresses with gold piping). The archbishop of Canterbury offered them brandy during a recess and, later, the queen sat down on a red sofa, her skirt billowing, “and when she kicked up her legs for total joy, we did the same. It was the happiest of moments.”

Anne then fell “madly in love” with the charming Johnnie Althorp, but she made the mistake of introducing him to her friend Lady Fermoy, who, like a character out of Trollope, snapped him up for her own daughter. He vanished without telling her that the engagement was off. (Later he would become the father of Diana, Princess of Wales.) On the rebound, Anne married Colin Tennant, eventually Lord Glenconner, a millionaire with a castle in Scotland whose family fortune had come from the invention of bleach powder in 1798. Her father disapproved: Tennant was “nouveau riche.” On a Holkham pheasant-shooting weekend, where guns were “placed by rank,” an enraged Tennant was made to follow behind the lords, dukes and marquesses, walking with the beaters, the men who flush out the birds with sticks.

. . . .

[D]uring their 54 years of marriage Tennant was to lose his temper many times, often lying on the ground in a fetal position and howling. Nevertheless, Anne insists, he was “never boring.” When she asked him why he kept screaming at people, he answered: “I like making them squirm. I like making them frightened.” Why did he marry her? He said he knew she would never give up.

. . . .

In 1958 Tennant bought the island of Mustique in the Caribbean for £45,000 and developed it into a playground for millionaires and aristocrats. As a wedding present, he gave Princess Margaret and Antony Armstrong-Jones a piece of land where she built a villa, Les Jolies Eaux. After Margaret’s marriage broke down, she created a scandal by staying there with her young lover, Roddy Llewellyn.

Anne was made lady in waiting in 1971, a role she held for nearly 30 years. She was devoted to the princess, whom she feels was much maligned. Margaret was rude when she was bored, but she was also capable of great kindness. Anne saw to all her needs, accompanying her on royal tours and even living with her for a year in Kensington Palace, where one of Anne’s duties was to turn the garden hose on the cats of their neighbor Princess Michael of Kent.

Link to the rest at The Wall Street Journal (PG apologizes for the paywall, but hasn’t figured out a way around it.)

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Author Anna James launches virtual bookclub https://www.thepassivevoice.com/author-anna-james-launches-virtual-bookclub/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=author-anna-james-launches-virtual-bookclub https://www.thepassivevoice.com/author-anna-james-launches-virtual-bookclub/#respond Thu, 26 Mar 2020 18:02:10 +0000 https://www.thepassivevoice.com/?p=122827 Read more]]> From The Bookseller:

Pages & Co author Anna James hash created an online and interactive middle-grade book club called The Bookwanderers Club, supported by her publisher HarperCollins Children’s Books.

The book club will be made up of a weekly programme of interviews with some of the biggest stars and upcoming authors of the middle-grade world chaired by James and streamed live on her YouTube Channel.

James said: “So many authors are keen to help support readers, parents and teacher who are at home, and the idea for the Bookwanderers Club came out of trying to create a centralised, regular place to provide fun, inspiring content around children’s books, and also help support authors and independent bookshops during uncertain times.”

Link to the rest at The Bookseller

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