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How Can We Keep People With Dementia Reading As Long As Possible?

16 June 2017

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Kenzo

15 June 2017

Absolutely nothing to do with books or writing, but, to PG, highly entertaining. There’s sound, so if you’re watching at work with others nearby, you might want to put on headphones.

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43 Words Invented by Authors

4 June 2017

From Mental Floss via The Digital Reader:

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Murder on the Orient Express

1 June 2017


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PG suspects remakes of Agatha Christie classics will never cease. He does always enjoy seeing Kenneth Branagh in a movie, however.

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Anthem for Doomed Youth and The Last Laugh by Wilfred Owen

29 May 2017

Because there’s no one better than Sean Bean for performing World War I poetry of stark disillusionment:

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Star Trek: Discovery Proves That TV Is the Best Final Frontier of All

22 May 2017

From Wired:

BETWEEN 1967 AND 2005, 684 hour-long episodes of live-action Star Trek and 22 half-hour episodes of the animated series aired on TV. Allowing for commercial breaks, that gives us 521 hours of Star Trek, give or take. Add in the 13 movies, from 1979’s Star Trek: The Motion Picture to Star Trek Beyond in 2016, and you wind up with more than 48 full days of Star Trek—not counting books and comics, which, if you want to argue about canonicity and amount of content, my DMs are open. (Not really.)

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And now the first real look at the long-delayed new show Star Trek: Discovery has finally frontiered. I’m gonna watch that show, too. All 15 hours of it, set to air on the subscription streaming service CBS All Access in the autumn. (When I showed my editor the new trailer, he said, “Sure, but who’s gonna get CBS All Access?” “Me,” I meeped. “For that.”) As a lifelong, devout Trekkie, I hear your concerns about the new show—why did they keep pushing the release? Why did showrunner Bryan Fuller bail for American Gods? What is up with that awful typeface on the intertitle cards?—but like Star Trek itself, I remain hopeful.

In fact, I am fuller of hope now than I have been about any of the movies since the whale one (which I liked). Because Trek’s serialized self, its television self? That’s Trek’s best self.

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The trailer’s visuals combine the shiny, lens-flaring, camera-tilting modes of the JJ Abrams and Justin Lin reboot movies. But that slickness is a sop to non-fans. Give me bulkheads that wobble and actors pretending to fall over when the camera shakes to simulate the loss of inertial dampers after a phaser takes the forward shields down to 30 percent. I mean, I get it: The structural rigidity of epic-sci-fi movies turns pretty much every Trek film (except the good ones) into a quest adventure with a third-act reveal and a finale of VFX and explosions. But audiences get enough of that these days from Star Wars and Marvel movies. A television show, with more time for story and presumably way less money in the budget, let Star Trek get back to its authentic guts.

Link to the rest at Wired

 
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Amazon Echo Silver

14 May 2017

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Bladerunner 2049

9 May 2017

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How British and American Spelling Parted Ways

24 April 2017

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Farewell – ETAOIN SHRDLU – 1978

19 April 2017

Farewell – ETAOIN SHRDLU – 1978 from Linotype: The Film on Vimeo.

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