Bookstores

How Drawing Makes Me a Better Reader

16 June 2019

From Bookriot:

The Edward Cullen portrayed by Robert Pattinson in Twilight was not what I pictured. Despite having read the book several times and a clear description that points out Edward’s “bronze” hair, somehow I imagined him with black, curly hair a bit past his ears. Imagine my surprise when, after seeing the movie, I went back to the text and saw that, huh, yeah, he does have bronze hair. Who knew?

Physical character descriptions have always eluded me. For however many times I’ve seen the phrase “almond-shaped” in reference to eyes — on the occasions I do pick up on physical descriptions — I still don’t know exactly what that means. (To be fair, I’ve also Googled it and there doesn’t actually seem to be a consensus on that particular image. At least not as far as you can trust a Google Image search to represent a concept.) And unlike many readers, I don’t think I really picture characters and scenes in my head as I read. It may work that way for Sam in iCarly, but not me.

. . . .

I struggle to visualize characters, settings, and whatever other visual descriptions in my mind’s eye. Either I come up with something that is definitely not what the author describes or I picture nothing at all. I just don’t have a picture playing in my head as I read. It’s probably why when I finish a book (never before, because spoilers!) I like to look at fan art. Oh, I think, that’s what that person is supposed to look like. I’m always sort of surprised at how many artists end up with similar concepts for fan art — had all of these details been in the text and I really missed that much?

. . . .

When I’m not reading, one of the things I like to do is draw. I don’t do it as often as I would like, but when I do, it actually does help me to better comprehend visual descriptions in text. If I’m working at a drawing of someone who’s got a thin nose, the act of drawing that nose reinforces the adjective and when I read it in text, the picture is sharper for me.

Not only does the act of drawing help to emphasize and reinforce the actual function of an adjective’s definition, but it also encourages me to pay greater attention to those small details. Especially if I’m creating my own fan art, I need to make a more conscious effort to be aware of physical descriptions. This means I’m also reading the text in general more closely. A sentence may start off about the many adventures of a cowgirl on the run, but there could be a detail about the particular coppery hue of her braid that I would have missed if I were to read more casually.

. . . .

Is “deep reading” better than “surface reading”? Of course not. There are books that perhaps call for closer readings and some that are just fine with a more superficial skim. But like most other things, the quality — quality here meaning the richness of comprehension, not necessarily superiority — and the quantity of your reading activities are often inversely correlated.

Link to the rest at Bookriot

PG did an image search and found the following from Kendra Powell:

The Last Bookstore in Downtown Los Angeles

16 June 2019

An 8.5 minute film
.

A Rare Bookstore That’s Still Thriving in New York City

16 June 2019

A 2.5 minute film.
.

Brooklyn’s Most-Cluttered Bookstore

16 June 2019

A seven-minute film.
.

Turned Pages

16 June 2019

As even the least-observant visitor to TPV has noticed, PG has been on a video spree. He promises this will not continue, but he will post a handful of additional book-related videos he has discovered during his brief video journey.

The following 8-minute documentary is titled Turned Pages.

 

Bookstores in Movies – 6

15 June 2019

Crossing Delancy

From IMDB:

Isabelle (Amy Irving) is a young independent woman who works in a bookstore. She meets regularly with her friends, and often goes to visit and spends time with her Jewish grandmother (wonderfully played by Reizl Bozyk), or bubbie as she calls her, who thinks its sad that she doesn’t have a man in her life. Trying to do something about that, her grandmother hires a marriage broker, and Isabelle ends up getting fixed up with a guy who sells pickles, Sam Posner (Peter Riegert). Isabelle is not very happy about it to begin with, since she is interested in the writer Anton Maes (Jeroen Krabbé), who does readings at the bookstore she works in. She is not very interested in Sam to begin with, and declines his offer to take her out when they meet for the first time at her grandmothers apartment. Sam is very persistent though, and Isabelle starts to warm up to him slowly as he woos his way into her heart. Still being very interested in Anton Maes, she fixes Sam up with her best friend Ricky. A good idea to begin with, but as Isabelle starts to like Sam more and more and discovers that maybe Anton Maes isn’t that great, she starts spending more time with Sam.

Link to the rest at IMDB

Bookstores in Movies – 5

15 June 2019

The Bookshop

From IMDB:

England, 1959. Free-spirited widow Florence Green (Emily Mortimer) risks everything to open a bookshop in a conservative East Anglian coastal town. While bringing about a surprising cultural awakening through works by Ray Bradbury and Vladimir Nabokov, she earns the polite but ruthless opposition of a local grand dame (Patricia Clarkson) and the support and affection of a reclusive book loving widower (Bill Nighy). As Florence’s obstacles amass and bear suspicious signs of a local power struggle, she is forced to ask: is there a place for a bookshop in a town that may not want one? Based on Penelope Fitzgerald’s acclaimed novel and directed by Isabel Coixet (Learning to Drive), The Bookshop is an elegant yet incisive rendering of personal resolve, tested in the battle for the soul of a community.

Link to the rest at IMDB

Bookstores in Movies – 4

15 June 2019

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

From IMDB:

It’s Year 2 at Hogwarts, and Harry Potter, Ron, and Hermione are back learning, but their year doesn’t go passed quietly. Members of the school are turning up petrified and bloody writings are appearing on the walls, revealing to everyone, that someone has opened the Chamber of Secrets. The attacks continue, bringing the possibility of the closure of Hogwarts. Harry and his friends are now forced to secretly uncover the truth about the chamber before the school closes or any lives are taken.

Link to the rest at IMDB

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